Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "prison" ...

  • Jailhouse Jeopardy

    In 2009, the Department of Justice unearthed piles of evidence of abuse, deaths and corruption at the Harris County jail – and then they’d gone away. But instead of improvements local officials had promised, the Houston Chronicle’s own wide-ranging probe – called Jailhouse Jeopardy – revealed the county jail – one of the nation’s largest – remained an extremely dangerous and violent place. The series documented dozens of preventable deaths, rampant abuse of prisoners by guards – including two guard-related homicides, unjust prosecutions launched by guards who’d abused inmates and tough judges who routinely locked up elderly and even dying defendants in one of Texas’ most extreme pretrial detention policies. The series featured compelling video testimonials of violent and tragic episodes, including a widow who watched her husband die in a jailhouse restraint video, parents who lost their son after he contracted the flu in jail, a man locked up for three years after being accused of a crime by a guard who'd broken his finger and many other untold stories.
  • Cruel and Unusual: The Texas Prison Crisis

    A WFAA investigation found that pigs are treated better than inmates inside Texas' prison system, where inmates are dying painful and preventable deaths and guards are also sickened by the stifling heat inside un-air conditioned units, prompting calls by critics at the United Nations and elsewhere for reform. https://vimeo.com/wfaa/review/151846234/686ead36ea
  • Incredible Cops

    This three-part series -- part of WNYC's ongoing NYPD Bruised project -- examined how often NYPD officers lie, what the department does about it and the overall impact on the criminal justice system. WNYC identified more than 120 officers with a documented credibility issue in the past decade. Many stayed on the street where they continued to make arrests. Their word -- in sworn statements -- put people in prison. Defendants often never learn if the officer accusing them of a crime has a history of lying despite a constitutional right to such information. WNYC also found the NYPD and prosecutors have failed to make simple fixes to address the problem. As part of the series, WNYC produced a first-of-its-kind map and chart showing the laws and court precedents governing disclosure of police disciplinary records in all 50 states. http://www.wnyc.org/story/police-misconduct-records/
  • Dying on his watch -- Georgia female inmates denied medical care

    For nearly a decade, a succession of female prison inmates in Georgia suffered agonizing deaths from medical neglect and others in obvious distress were denied essential care as the state turned a blind eye to the physician responsible.
  • Child Predators in the Military

    Over six months of reporting, including filing numerous federal Freedom of Information Act requests and appeals to unearth details of scores of cases, The Associated Press found that the largest category of criminals in the military prison system are in for sex crimes against children. It also found that harsh sentences announced publicly were substantially reduced under plea agreements that were not routinely disclosed, and that military proceedings are opaque compared with the degree of openness of civilian courts. The lack of transparency made accessing the records needed for this story a significant challenge. http://www.sfgate.com/news/item/AP-interactive-Military-child-sex-assaults-48405.php
  • Violation of Trust

    A Belleville News-Democrat investigation found that out of 6,744 felony sex crimes reported by victims to police from 2005-2013 in 32 Southern Illinois counties, 70 percent were not prosecuted. And when they were, fewer than one in 10 suspects ever went to prison. Prosecutors blamed police, saying most of the cases they received did not have enough evidence to secure a conviction. http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index2.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index3.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index4.html
  • A Perfect Storm

    Findings from a Channel 4 I-Team investigation that stretched over a two-year period into Tennessee prisons and the department of correction resulted in 2015 in four legislative hearings, an independent audit, proof that lawmakers received faulty information in testimony, calls for the resignation of the commissioner and forced the department to re-define how it classified assaults.
  • See No Evil: A Miami Herald Investigation

    For more than two years, Brown has investigated corruption, brutality and the systemic, barbaric abuse of inmates in Florida’s prison system, the nation’s third largest. In 2015, Florida prison deaths were at an all-time high, and use of force against inmates had more than doubled in five years. Brown began to examine why and discovered a disturbing pattern of deliberate indifference and even blatant cover-ups among corrections officers, commanders and the agency’s top leaders who often looked the other way as inmates were beaten, starved and killed.
  • System Failure

    An innocent man spends 6 years in prison for the murder of his infant daughter. It was never a crime to begin with. The forensic science used to convict him was flawed. It’s another example of the shoddy work of a Minnesota medical examiner we have investigated and reported on since early 2010. We continued our coverage this year with 2 more stories. One features an in-depth look at the case of the man wrongfully convicted of killing his child who was set free after a review of the evidence. The other examines the mysterious death of an Army National guardsman and the lack of a thorough investigation by the medical examiner to find the true cause of the soldier’s death.
  • Doctors in Georgia

    The citizens of Georgia are largely dependent on the state's medical board to protect them from incompetent or unscrupulous. These stories revealed that the board has failed to carry out that mission - by licensing doctors that other states considered untouchable, leaving patients in the dark about key issues such as the true nature of disciplinary actions and funneling some of the worst physicians into the state prison system.