Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "projects" ...

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    Atlanta Business Chronicle tells the story of a Savings and Loan that the government not only allowed to fail but helped to create and illegally capitalize; the S&L was created with the capital of 43 acres of land that the government valued at 10 times its assessed value; the S&L took deposits from a poor rural community to finance risky projects in wealthy areas, Dec. 17, 1993.
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    Associated Press reveals how Virginia's public university system was getting further away from its mission to teach students as fewer professors teach and more pursue research projects; also explores how millions of dollars raised for schools by fundraisers is spent not to help students' education but to help projects backed by big donors, Sept. 12 - 15, 1993.
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    Milwaukee Journal finds several problems with the U.S. water supply, inlcuding pork barrel projects which put public health at risk, neglect by state and federal employees, and the fact that the nation's largest outbreak of waterborne illness was predicted in over 1,000 scientific reports which weren't acted on, Sept. 19 - 26, 1993.
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    Kansas City Star reveals how the transformation of Branson, Mo. into a booming tourist town was accomplished at the expense of poor building inspections; one inspector is in charge of hundreds of projects and some buildings catch fire or collapse before they're even finished and then are not investigated, October 1993.
  • Death Trap on Wheels

    Daily Breeze describes how a defense contractor given a large contract for objective consulting allowed one of its reports to "disappear" after a 4 - star general complained that it would endanger one of his pet projects; the incident involved billions of dollars and instigated an investigation by the Inspector General, October - November 1993.
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    Florida Times-Union (Jacksonville) looks at the work hours of judges in Duval County, Fla., and finds that many of them routinely worked six-, five-and even four-hour days before going home to work on their personal projects, June 14, 1992.
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    Dallas Observer finds that the city of Dallas is not meeting its goals for minority participation in city contracts for services and supplies, including construction projects; discovers that some Anglo construction companies that do large projects for the city are finding creative, if not illegal, ways to circumvent these goals, including front schemes, Dec. 10, 1992.
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    The Day Publishing Co. (New London, Conn.) finds dire health effects from lead exposure among workers on state bridge projects; reports that the state has known of the danger for over three years, Aug. 30, 1992.
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    St. Louis Post-Dispatch examines the state of Illinois' bidding procedure for federally funded highway projects, and finds that the contracts are handed out competition free, costing the state $26 million over five years, August - December 1992.
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    San Diego Business Journal recounts the story of four men who, in a last-ditch effort to find funding for their real estate projects, answered a "money-to-lend" ad in a newspaper, which got them involved with a con man who eventually gained control of their property; finds that San Diego's real estate recession is causing developers to take risks that make them vulnerable to exploitation, Sept. 28, 1992.