Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "public housing" ...

  • Better Government Association and WBEZ: TRAPPED

    In Chicago’s public housing for senior residents, something as simple as taking an elevator can be dangerous. The Better Government Association and WBEZ 91.5FM investigated how the Chicago Public Housing Authority failed to maintain safe operating conditions in dozens of elevators.
  • The Daily News: New York City Housing Authority Expose

    The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) repeatedly lied to deny the findings of a lengthy investigation by Daily News reporter Greg. B. Smith that uncovered fetid conditions at the 175,000 apartments in the country's largest housing authority. Once the cover-up was exposed, NYCHA entered into an unprecedented consent decree to allow a federal monitor to oversee its operations.
  • KyCIR: Despite Calls For Help, Bedbugs Infest Louisville Public Housing Complex

    Residents of a high-rise public housing complex for the elderly complained for years about the bedbugs. It was a relentless infestation that the housing authority paid little attention to, and the city’s code enforcement officers insisted they weren’t responsible for. Jacob Ryan used data and interviews with residents to show that the issue was pervasive -- and ignored.
  • Neglected Neighbors: How Elderly Housing Policies Fail Connecticut's Most Vulnerable

    Thismulti-part series investigates a decades-old policy that mixes the elderly with disabled residents of any age in the same public housing. Dating back to the bills that established public housing during President Roosevelt’s administration, the definition of “elderly” was defined to include not only people over a certain age, but also people with disabilities. Today, that definition remains, despite decades-worth of government studies that show it to be problematic to house these populations together. Recommendations were made to ease management and social issues, but few were implemented. In Connecticut, legislators have been repeatedly warned about worsening issues by housing authorities and residents. Today, the policy is still in effect, and failing both the elderly and disabled people who live there.
  • The Impact After the CHA Plan for Transformation

    Data from U.S. Housing & Urban Development, the Chicago Housing Authority and the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed by census tract in the city of Chicago and by municipality in the six-county suburban area for the years 2000 and 2015. In 1999, Mayor Richard M. Daley boldly promised to transform public housing in Chicago — in part by tearing down the high-rise housing projects that lined the city’s expressways and surrounded the Loop. Today, nearly every Chicago neighborhood — and almost every suburb — has felt the impact of the Chicago Housing Authority’s “Plan for Transformation,” a Better Government Association and Chicago Sun-Times analysis has found. https://cst.carto.com/viz/2a5170a2-2ec4-11e6-93e7-0ecd1babdde5/public_map https://cst.carto.com/viz/c1072cca-3438-11e6-bce7-0e31c9be1b51/public_map
  • Stop The Mold

    Reporters from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism's NYCity News Service worked with the New York Daily News on a series of stories chronicling the city's losing battle to rid public housing of mold and detailing the related health and financial tolls extracted by the crisis.
  • Subsidized Squalor

    The residents of Richmond’s public housing had given up. They used to speak up when things got bad. But they’d long ago stopped believing anyone would listen. They resigned themselves to sharing their bedrooms with cockroaches and bedbugs and ceding their common areas to criminals. Deep down, the frustration simmered. It finally came spilling out with fury after The Center for Investigative Reporting’s Amy Julia Harris exposed the squalid conditions in Richmond public housing, giving those residents the voice they’d lost.
  • Dumping Grounds?; Just Moving On; Six More Years

    "The Chicago Housing Authority will spend $1.6 billion on its 'Plan for Transformation'- a 10-year urban reform plan to destroy and tear-down more than 38,000 units of high-rise public housing and rebuild vibrant condo-style mixed-income housing in its place. Yet seven years into the plan, the authority has only built 1,600 replacement units of a promised 6,000 in mixed-income condos."
  • The Final Frontier

    This investigation looks into the Chicago Housing Authority and demographic changes that have occurred with the destruction of public housing. Starting with 1995, The Chicago Reporter analyzed residential property transactions and home mortgage lending data, as well as Census data to track significant racial and economic shifts over the years.
  • Rapid Change

    The authors analyzed home mortgage data to evaluate which areas of Chicago are growing the fastest. They found that the fastest growing housing market in Chicago exists in areas near recently torn down public housing. The authors explore this phenomenon, talk to many Chicago residents, and offer possible explanations for the increasing popularity of those neighborhoods.