Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "public resources" ...

  • Mexican Mafia Killer and the LAPD

    This series started off with a tip: Los Angeles police were bringing a high-profile criminal to a private business event in downtown L.A. That criminal turned out to be Rene "Boxer" Enriquez, a former shot-caller for the Mexican Mafia sentenced to life in prison for two killings. That the LAPD would use public resources to bring him to a private event was only the first surprise — we soon learned Enriquez had a cozy relationship with law enforcement officials and was set to be paroled. We spent weeks digging into his background, contacting the children of one of his victims, interviewing people who knew him, reading court records and transcripts outlining his crimes. The reporting by The Times ultimately prompted two investigations by the LAPD, including one into a high-profile deputy chief. The governor also decided to deny Enriquez parole and keep him behind bars.
  • Aura of Power

    Through a series of stories, CBC Edmonton's investigative unit revealed the abuse of public resources by former Alberta Premier Alison Redford. The series revealed the premier had secretly ordered herself a luxury penthouse, flew her daughter on government planes dozens of times, and employed a scheme to block passengers from government flights so she could fly alone with a chosen entourage.
  • Shades of Gray

    Education Week examines how the funding of public schools may change as the nation's population ages. As the baby boomer generation nears retirement age, many analysts believe schools will face tougher competition for public resources. "It is far from a given, but many analysts have foreseen that an economy that is straining to pay the public and private pensions, an even more, the medical costs of a mammoth elderly population will have trouble finding money for the needs of young people."