Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "public safety" ...

  • Bad Neighbor Banks: How Big Lenders Spread Blight

    Across South Florida, on block after block, homes abandoned in the foreclosure crisis have become eyesores, depressing property values, and posing health and safety hazards for nearby families. The Sun Sentinel investigated and found who was responsible for letting these homes rot: some of the world’s largest banks.
  • The Brunswick Stew

    “The Brunswick Stew” is a series of investigative reports that began with plea from a citizens group in Brunswick, Virginia. They asked for help shining some light on what was going on in their county. The effort would take several months. Filing FOI requests and pouring over a seemingly endless pile of paperwork, a number of serious issues came to light. Illegal bonuses and contracts, back room politics, political favoritism in the awarding of bids, and a blatant case of public safety being put at risk are what “The Brunswick Stew” unveils.
  • A City Program's Deadly Failures

    In this story, we uncovered dangerous breakdowns in a DC program critical to public safety. It had received millions of city dollars to rehabilitate young offenders without locking them up. Yet we found many of its teens did not get any services at all, and dozens were murdered or arrested for murder. As a result of our reporting, the city overhauled the program and the mayor called for an investigation by the attorney general.
  • War Zone: The Destruction of an All-American City

    The hour-long documentary War Zone: The Destruction of an All-American City takes an unprecedented look at the impact of corruption on the East St. Louis, Illinois area, one of the poorest and most violent communities in America. The program was broadcast twice during prime time; Tuesday night at 8 pm on August 28, and the following Saturday night at 7 pm. This project was the result of an ongoing decade-long probe of government waste, corruption, police misconduct, and violence in East St. Louis and the surrounding villages by investigative reporter Craig Cheatham. Our documentary begins with a detailed look at police misconduct and corruption, how it has contributed to the breakdown of public safety in the East St. Louis area, and why local politicians tolerated such outrageous behavior by their officers. The second part of our documentary focuses on the impact of derelict and vacant housing, the slumlords who own the property and the people who live in some of the worst housing in the metro area. Our investigation also uncovered new connections between politicians and legendary slumlord Ed Sieron, who was business partners with a longtime mayor. In addition, KMOV revealed that of the 500 mostly rundown properties that Sieron owns in East St. Louis, only 13 were cited for code violations. That lack of accountability for the notorious slumlord, empowered him and made the people living in his homes feel powerless. War Zone also exposes the way East St. Louis communities have sold their economy to vice-driven businesses like strip clubs, liquor stores, a casino, and convenience marts that had a long history of selling illegal synthetic drugs. Our investigation found that nearly all of these businesses failed to employ a significant number of East St. Louis residents, even though they received millions of dollars in tax incentives that are paid by East St. Louis residents. At the same time East St. Louis is handing out tax breaks to wealthy out-of-town businessmen, it repeatedly refused to provide the same tax incentives for local residents who wanted to create family friendly businesses that would employ people living in the East St. Louis area.
  • Firepower

    This series illuminates the consequences of the gun lobby's influence on laws, lives, and public safety.
  • Shattered Trust

    The public assumes sterile alcohol wipes are sterile or at least clean enough not to be dangerous. But an ongoing investigation in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel found that wipes -- sterile and nonsterile -- can be dangerously contaminated, and federal regulators are not doing much to protect the public. When there are recalls, the public is not finding out because of lax communication and weak tools for regulators.
  • Fabricated and Flawed Integrity Tests Threaten Public Safety and an Iconic $6.3 Billion Bridge

    The investigation found that a technician who tested the structural integrity of the other new San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge fudnation had fabricated results on othe structures and committed numberous testing errors, callling to question the stability of California's costliest and most important public works project ever, among other freeway structures statewide.
  • The Arming Question

    Princeton Public Safety officers are sworn police officers who have the same training and enforce the same laws as local police officers, and they are responsible for responding to the same incidents -- including armed incidents -- as local officers. Yet University Public Safety officers are forbidden from carrying guns. Despite the Virginia Tech shootings and three gun scares on Princeton's campus in recent years, the University has been steadfast in its opposition to arming its officers. But our investigation casts doubt on the University's conclusion that keeping officers unarmed will not affect the response to a shooter on campus and that arming would negatively impact student-officer relationships.
  • Excessive Force on the Force

    KUSA obtains a videotape from a case involving excessive police force that had been hidden from the defendants themselves and it brings new light to the case.
  • Grounds for Removal

    This investigation reveals lax government oversight of the nation's largest statewide natural gas pipeline system. It shows Texas regulators failing to conduct proper oversight and rarely penalized gas companies after fatal gas explosions.