Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "public works projects" ...

  • Bribery Division

    The Bribery Division, an international investigation into Latin America’s largest construction company, reveals fresh evidence of hundreds of millions of dollars in suspicious payments linked to major infrastructure projects. Brazilian multinational Odebrecht has been implicated in a cash-for-contracts scandal that the U.S. Department of Justice has described as “the largest foreign bribery case in history.” The Bribery Division investigation unveils dramatic new information in taking readers inside the belly of the beast: Odebrecht’s Division of Structured Operations, a specialized unit created for the primary purpose of managing the company’s graft. A team of more than 50 journalists across the Americas, led by ICIJ, examined more than 13,000 Odebrecht documents from a secret communication platform used by the Structured Operations unit. The team’s sprawling expose revealed Odebrecht’s cash-for-contracts operation was even bigger than the company had acknowledged to prosecutors and had involved prominent figures and massive public works projects not mentioned in the criminal cases or other official inquiries to date.
  • Insider Deals at Airports Authority

    The Washington Examiner's Liz Essley exposed government nepotism and corruption with her coverage of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, which oversees two airports and one of the largest ongoing public works projects in the nation, the $6 billion Silver Line. In addition to a series of stories detailing insider deals and nepotism, Essley's July 31 report on a $180,000 job given to former board member Mame Reiley the day after she resigned from the board caused the nation's top transportation official, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood, to demand immediate reform at the authority, as he stated in an interview with the Washington Post Aug. 13 and before a Congressional committee Nov. 16.
  • Easy Pass: Why Bechtel Never Paid for its Big Dig Mistakes"

    The Boston Globe investigates "who, if anyone, was to blame for more than $1.6 billion in construction cost overruns on the nation's largest, most expensive public works project, "the Big Dig," and why those responsible had never been held accountable. What we found was that Bechtel/Parsons Brinckerhoff, the mega-corporate joint venture running the project, committed a series of poor decisions, design mistakes, and imprecise research findings that led to about two-thirds of the overruns. The company's political connections, lobbyists, and cross pollination with state and federal officials go a long way toward explaining why the company was never held accountable."
  • The Bay Bridge: Where The Fault Lies

    A three-day examination of how one of California's most visible and expensive public works projects foundered, and the cost to taxpayers as a result of the foul-ups.
  • (Untitled)

    Santa Barbara (Calif.) Independent finds that Santa Barbara County accepted personal guarantees from contractors to construct major public works projects, whereupon the contrators were paid up front and started but did not finish the projects, leaving the county the victim of fraud, Sept. 26, 1991. *
  • Bid-rigging and blackmail in public works projects

    Newsday (Long Island, N.Y.) investigation finds bid-rigging and blackmail allow five Long Island contractors to dominate major public works projects.