Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "race" ...

  • All Politics Is Racial

    “All Politics Is Racial” is a thorough examination of the first mayoral term of James McGee, the town of Vinita Park's first black mayor. His election – which he was accused of stealing -- was a direct reflection of 60 years worth of larger economic and societal forces at work in the north St. Louis County region. By the time I began my reporting there, the city had already paid out three-quarters of $1 million to a group of fired, white police officers who say they were run out of the town's tiny department and replaced with black officers. Additional lawsuits – including one for sexual harassment -- are pending. Through extensive interviews and document searches, I attempted to piece together what is really going on in this tiny hamlet.
  • The Magnitsky Affair

    The Magnitsky project uncovered how nearly a billion dollars that disappeared from the Russian treasury ended up in offshore accounts, paper companies and apartments in New York City to the benefit of two privileged Russians and their associates. The Russian government had maintain that tracing the lost money was impossible because important records had been lost in what they described as an accident. They never tried, but OCCRP reporters painstakingly combed through hard-to-obtain bank records, land records and other documents to trace the money as it was hidden, transferred and laundered. The project has sparked investigations in a handful of countries, won numerous journalism accolades and has kept alive the memory of Segei Magnitsky, the Russian lawyer turned whistleblower who paid with his life for trying to expose the corrupt theft of tax money in Moscow.
  • Labyrinth: Reardon staff linked to harassment, surveillance

    Our stories traced a maze of social media attack sites and anonymous public records requests to staff in the Snohomish County (Wash.) Executive's Office. It took us three years of reporting to reach that point. Our initial investigation and subsequent stories revealed a scheme of political payback against perceived rivals of the executive, the county's top elected official. A week after we published our first story, the executive announced he would leave office. He stepped down a few months later.
  • Made in Bangladesh

    Following two deadly factory disasters, Fault Lines traces Bangladesh’s garment supply chain to investigate whether U.S. retailers like Walmart and Gap know where their clothes are being made. In November 2012, a fire at the Tazreen Fashions factory in Bangladesh killed at least 112 people. Walmart’s Faded Glory brand shorts were among the clothing found in the charred remains. Walmart blamed its supplier, saying the order had been subcontracted to Tazreen without its authorization. But as Fault Lines follows the paper trail of the Faded Glory order, what some call an “open secret” is revealed: that corporations deliberately turn a blind eye to the practice of subcontracting. The owner of the factory at the center of the Faded Glory order describes how it ended up in Tazreen, and an insider explains how retailers cut corners to keeps prices low. To confirm the allegations, Fault Lines visits an unauthorized finishing house, where children as young as 12 are unexpectedly found working on Old Navy products.
  • Texas Schools/Racial Divisions

    This was a 6-part series reported and written by students at The University of Texas at Austin and published in The Dallas Morning News (in print and online) and in Reporting Texas (an online news site at The University of Texas at Austin). The series examined the "resegregation" of public schools -- and how little had changed in public schools since the Brown v. Board of Education ruling in the 1950s ordering the end of segregated classrooms. The groundbreaking work involved deep dives into data, pressing public officials for accountability, exploring the inequities in the public education system.
  • The da Vinci Debate

    Some 450,000 people had robot-assisted surgery in 2012, making Intuitive Surgical, the maker of the da Vinci machine, one of the hottest stocks around. Hospitals across the country embrace the cutting-edge surgical device but criticism is mounting. CNBC's Herb Greenberg investigates allegations of problems in the operating room in his latest documentary, "The da Vinci Debate."
  • Colorado's Failing Parole System

    A father of three, gunned down for his pizza delivery uniform. That uniform is then used in the murder of Colorado’s Prisons Chief, shot and killed when he answered his front door. The man who carried out the killings: a career criminal on parole. A series of Call7 Breaking News Investigations uncovers the catastrophic failure of Colorado’s parole division. Failures that allowed a parolee identified as high risk and assigned a specially trained officer, to commit murder- twice. A parolee absconder who Call7 Investigator Theresa Marchetta uncovered committed both murders while “off the grid” as parole officers at all levels ignored critical alerts he was on the run for nearly a week. Marchetta holds officials accountable for the fatal oversights that took place. Her investigations led to immediate and long-term meaningful changes at the Colorado Department of Corrections, including a new policy requiring officers to respond to ankle bracelet tamper alerts, new equipment for parole officers, legislative hearings and a change in leadership at the parole division.
  • The downfall of a jet-setting university president

    Evan Dobelle is a self-described visionary who compares himself to Apple founder Steve Jobs, and he charmed his way into the job of president at Westfield State University despite his checkered past. For years, Dobelle’s outsized personality dominated the western Massachusetts school -- until Globe reporters obtained copies of Dobelle’s outrageous business expense reports last July. Four months later, Dobelle resigned in disgrace on the heels of a series of investigative reports in the Globe that described hundreds of thousands of dollars in questionable business expenses, including exotic travel, luxury hotels, limo rides and an entire “business” trip to San Francisco that appears to have been a sham. Dobelle now faces an attorney general’s investigation for allegedly filing false claims to collect expenses. The Globe stories raised difficult questions about the quality of supervision in Massachusetts state universities, which rely on unpaid trustees to oversee hundreds of millions in public spending. Dobelle, it turned out, had been fired for wasteful spending and dishonesty at the University of Hawaii, but Westfield State trustees hired him anyway, then looked away when he resumed his free spending ways in Massachusetts.
  • A Candidate Exposed: Investigating Sheriff Paul Babeu

    Arizona Sheriff Paul Babeu made frequent appearances on national media programs most often espousing strong partisan political views about his positions on immigration, border security and guns. He was labeled a rising star by many including members of his own party. But when Paul Babeu first started talking about running for congress, we realized nobody really knew too much about his background. By the time Paul Babeu declared his candidacy for congress in January 2012, we had already begun to work on going past the hyperbolic political rhetoric to examine candidate Babeu’s background and Sheriff Babeu’s job performance. Over the next five months, in at least a dozen exclusive investigative reports, ABC15 Investigators uncovered and exposed the dark side to Paul Babeu’s past and chronicled the troubling patterns of his performance as Pinal County Sheriff. Our entry for the IRE Award includes our exclusive and explosive reports revealing Babeu’s inappropriate relationship with a student while he served as headmaster of a Massachusetts boarding school. Our stories also shed light on his performance in office. Our relentless investigations and our efforts to provide our viewers with facts about Sheriff Paul Babeu contributed to his decision to withdraw from the race and end his candidacy for U.S. Congress.
  • Free The Files

    To learn more about how dark money groups spent the money they were secretly raising, ProPublica launched the “Free the Files” project. First, we enlisted volunteers to gather files from local TV stations detailing political ad buys and share them with us to release online. These records, previously available only on paper to people who visited the stations in person, provided details about spending often not included in the groups’ reports to election authorities. The FCC later ordered some stations to put ad buy data online, but the jumble of documents posted could not be digitally searched. To make the information useful, ProPublica created a news application that showed volunteers how to sort the records by market, amount and -- most critically -- by candidate or group. More than 1,000 people helped us create a database that logged up to $1 billion in ads. Tapping this data, ProPublica reporters were able to show how massive infusions of dark money influenced races in Ohio and New Mexico.