Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "race" ...

  • Channel 4 News: Cambridge Analytica Uncovered

    An undercover investigation into political data firm Cambridge Analytica that revealed company bosses boasting of manipulating elections around the world, spreading untraceable propaganda, and using bribes and honey-traps to smear political opponents.
  • Baltimore Sun: The Baltimore Police Gun Trace Task Force Scandal

    The Baltimore Sun’s coverage of arguably the biggest corruption scandal in the history of the Baltimore Police Department continued into 2018, with the trials of the remaining officers charged in the federal case and the fallout from the case. The Sun produced work that revealed the suburban drug case that led authorities to the rogue squad, how the convictions thrust into question thousands of open and adjudicated cases involving the officers and what the trials revealed about the deep reach of the city’s drug economy.
  • Fall From Grace: How Buffalo's Bishop Hid Sexual Abuse in the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo

    Damning documents from a confidential source were the basis for our three-part series on Bishop Richard J. Malone, which showed that Malone returned an accused child abuser to ministry after a previous bishop removed him; allowed another abusive priest to remain pastor of a wealthy parish despite multiple abuse allegations; and deceived the faithful by hiding the "real" abuse list -- containing more than 100 priests -- from the public.
  • Insult to Injury

    As Tesla races to revolutionize the automobile industry and build a more sustainable future, it has left its factory workers in the past, still painfully vulnerable to the dangers of manufacturing. Our reporting shows that Tesla prioritized speed over safety, ignored its own safety experts and denied proper medical care to injured workers. And in order to make its safety record look better than it really is, Tesla has kept injuries off the books. Our radio segments take listeners into the factory and behind the scenes, as whistleblowers tell their secrets and workers show the toll on their lives.
  • Stealing Hope

    Thousands of infants are happily adopted in the U.S. each year, but many prospective parents are duped during the process by scammers who fool them with fake babies. Most of these con artists never attempt to extort any money from prospective parents, making them all but impossible to prosecute. They seem content playing a sick game with very desperate people and they steal nothing more than hope.
  • The Education of Edwin Raymond

    For a cover story in the New York Times Magazine, Investigative Fund reporter Saki Knafo uses exclusive, secretly recorded audio from one officer, Edwin Raymond, to expose the NYPD’s rigid insistence on fulfilling arrest quotas — and the racial biases behind them — despite public denials that such a quota system exists. The story sparked a follow-up investigation by NBC New York and coverage by several other outlets. Ultimately, the story resulted in the promotion of the whistleblowing officer.
  • 'Not Wanted': Racial Bias at Trump Properties

    In the weeks leading up to the presidential election, the NBC News Investigative Unit and MSNBC broadcast an in-depth report on the Trump family business’s racist practices in the 1960's through the early 1980's, when African-Americans seeking to rent apartments in New York City were turned away because of the color of their skin.
  • Decoding Discrimination

    Hiring workers based on race or sex is illegal, but Reveal found that some companies skirted the law by contracting out their discriminatory practices to temp agencies. https://www.revealnews.org/episodes/decoding-discrimination-in-americas-temp-industry/ https://www.revealnews.org/blog/decoding-the-language-of-discrimination/
  • The Traffickers: The Girl in the Window

    The Traffickers is an investigative documentary series which traces the global trafficking routes of some of the world’s most sought after commodities: Gold, exotic animals, sex, even human body parts - anything can be bought for a price. The aim was ambitious - to give an exclusive guide to the global black market world, with high production values, excellent cinematography, dynamic story-telling and outstanding journalism. The series is presented by Nelufar Hedayat, who herself was trafficked as a child refugee from war-torn Afghanistan. During the course of filming, Nelufar visited 22 different countries, criss-crossing the world to follow the story. The Dark Side of Adoption reveals how American couples adopting babies from the DRC can be caught up in an adoption scam which hoodwinks unsuspecting parents into giving up their children.
  • A Cry for Help

    The trend was unmistakable. Minnesotans who were suicidal or otherwise having a mental health crisis were dying in confrontations with police. The Star Tribune decided to go beyond the anecdotes and develop the first comprehensive database of individuals killed after encounters with police in Minnesota. An exhaustive analysis of death certificate data, news accounts, police reports and other records revealed a powerful statistic: 45 percent of those who died in forceful encounters with police were in crisis or had a history of mental illness. The number was even more stark for 2015: nine of 13 killed fell into that category. The Star Tribune multimedia project “A Cry for Help” showed the collision of a broken mental health system with law enforcement, the responders of last resort. While questions of police conduct and use of force have revolved around race, one advocacy group estimated that mentally ill people are 16 times more likely to die in a police encounter than others. Our team faced the challenge of how to tell this story in a fresh and engaging way. They did it by obtaining extraordinary access to individuals: A cop who had killed two people, each of whom threatened him amid their mental breakdowns. The mother of a young mentally ill man killed by police who now advocates for better training. A man who tried to commit suicide by cop whose survival demonstrates how these situations don’t have to end in tragedy. These narratives were enhanced by hard-fought access to dozens of police case files that included powerful police video footage of a St. Paul standoff in 2015. The project also quantified, for the first time, the stories of every person who died in an encounter with police since 2000, and that database is now continually updated on the Star Tribune website.