Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "race" ...

  • Racial Slurs Are Woven Deep Into The American Landscape

    The removal of the confederate flag from the Statehouse in South Carolina spawned the re-evaluation of confederate symbols across the South. We felt this issue went much deeper among various racial groups across the entire the entire nation. We were curious to know how many other locations across the US still had names that would be considered derogatory in today’s society.
  • The Changing Face of America

    Most data-driven discussions about race focus either on the national level (which masks local trends) or are centered on areas of conflict (such as Ferguson, Mo.) USA TODAY wanted to give people the tools that would allow them to explore how race end ethnicity have changed over time -- where they live and where they go to school. But how do you measure diversity when such trends wax and wane over time? Is a community that changed from nearly all-white to all-black as diverse as an area that received a high level of immigrants? Why do some communities barely notice big changes over time, while others become a nexus of violence? And how does the change in my community compare to anyone else's? To do that USA TODAY needed a tool to level the playing field, a way to show 100 years of change both locally and nationally, on the same scale. The series, based on the USA TODAY Diversity Index, is explanatory data at its best: quantifying incremental change that everyone sees anecdotally.
  • Failure Factories

    On Dec. 18, 2007, the Pinellas County School Board abandoned integration. They justified the vote with bold promises: Schools in poor, black neighborhoods would get more money, more staff, more resources. They delivered none of that. This is the story of how district leaders turned five once-average schools into Failure Factories.
  • The Shocking Truth About Florida’s Pools

    The Shocking Truth about Pools is a ground breaking investigation that is changing pool safety laws and already saving lives. It began with the tragic electrocution of a 7-year-old boy April 13, 2014. Calder Sloan took a deep breath, jumped into the family pool, and raced across to the deep end. As he touched the pool light he was jolted to the surface by more than 120 volts. He never stood a chance of surviving. A week later three more children were shocked in an apartment complex pool. This time though, they all lived. We wanted to know how those in the apartment pool survived when Calder didn’t in his family pool. What we discovered were two different standards for commercial and residential pools. Commercial pools were required by law to carry low voltage power. That’s the equivalent of a 9 volt battery. Meanwhile residential pools can carry 120 volts or more. What’s the difference between 9 volts and 120 volts? Life and death. It was something the pool industry knew very well… but had kept quiet in the name of profits.
  • Trail of Troubles

    One doctor’s sexual assault charges led reporter Scott Dance to uncover the state’s lack of oversight of the criminal backgrounds of Maryland’s doctors. Maryland does not conduct criminal background checks of its doctors despite at least one attempt to require them. Dr. William Dando was one doctor who fell through the cracks. He was convicted of rape in the 1980s, and came to Maryland to pursue his medical career after his release. Fast forward to 2014, and the same doctor was accused of sexually assaulting several patients. Dance traced Dando’s time in Maryland and all of the ways his past could have been discovered, but state regulatory agencies and medical boards failed to investigate. After Dance’s articles appeared, Dando agreed to give up his license so that Maryland charges would be dropped, an inspector general highlighted flaws in licensing procedures,and the Maryland Board of Physicians proposed legislation to require background checks.
  • CBS 5 Investigates: Lobbyist Gifts to Lawmakers

    CBS 5 Investigates uncovered thousands of dollars in gifts Arizona state lawmakers were accepting, but failing to report. During their investigation, they traced these gifts through a set of complex state databases that contained lobbyist disclosures, but did not directly connect them to the lawmakers they were financially benefitting. The computer-assisted portion of their investigation took more than 150 hours of analysis. Their finished product included two news stories that appeared during regular newscasts, and a 20-minute special report that aired as part of our 10pm news. In addition, They created a searchable database, that allowed their viewers to find out how much their lawmakers had accepted from lobbyists.
  • Trail of Troubles

    One doctor’s sexual assault charges led reporter Scott Dance to uncover the state’s lack of oversight of the criminal backgrounds of Maryland’s doctors. Maryland does not conduct criminal background checks of its doctors despite at least one attempt to require them. Dr. William Dando was one doctor who fell through the cracks. He was convicted of rape in the 1980s, and came to Maryland to pursue his medical career after his release. Fast forward to 2014, and the same doctor was accused of sexually assaulting several patients. Dance traced Dando’s time in Maryland and all of the ways his past could have been discovered, but state regulatory agencies and medical boards failed to investigate.
  • Investigation of charter school operator

    For years, Dr. Michael Sharpe was among the most prominent charter school leaders in Connecticut, collecting millions of dollars from lawmakers eager to embrace school reform, and harboring big plans to expand his already growing empire beyond the state’s borders. Today, that empire has collapsed, following deep and aggressive reporting by a team of Hartford Courant reporters who revealed that Sharpe had a felony conviction for financial fraud, had no doctoral degree despite calling himself “Dr.,” had misused state grant money and had turned his Jumoke Academy charter school into a den of nepotism and financial conflicts of interest. As the stories unfolded, Sharpe and his entire leadership team were forced out, and investigations were launched by the state Department of Education and the FBI, which is currently presenting evidence to a federal grand jury.
  • Following political money in a post-Citizens United world

    The Center for Public Integrity’s “Following political money in a post-Citizens United world” project was produced to help people understand which special interests are trying to influence U.S. elections, specifically by tracking the entities saturating television airwaves ahead of the 2014 elections and by following the money flowing from corporations to politically active nonprofits that generally do not disclose their donors. Together, the Center for Public Integrity’s widely used “Who’s Buying the Senate?” and “Who’s Calling the Shots in the States?” web apps allowed journalists and the General public to see what groups and power players were behind more than 2.5 million TV ads that aired in U.S. Senate races, statewide ballot measures and state-level contests such as gubernatorial elections and state Supreme Court races. Separately, the Center for Public Integrity’s seven-month-long analysis of voluntary corporate filings uncovered more than $173 million given to politically active nonprofits — such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce — that have been major players in elections and public policy battles.
  • Election 2014: Big Money, Secret Money

    In “Election 2014: Big Money, Secret Money,” the Center for Public Integrity tracked the impact and role of political advertising ahead of the Nov. 4 elections to help voters interpret special-interest influence on state-level and U.S. Senate elections in real time. Our unique project analyzed TV advertising for state-level races, statewide ballot measures and the battle over the U.S. Senate before voters went to the polls, then analyzed the results of those races as the election returns came in on Nov. 4. The stories we produced shined a light on what were essentially shadow campaigns occurring in races up and down the ballot, where outside groups and special interests spent millions of dollars independently of candidates and political parties to influence the outcomes.