Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "race" ...

  • 108 Hours: Inside the Hunt for the Boston Marathon Bombers

    As the one-year anniversary of the bombings approached, Brian Williams and a team of producers, crews and editors set out to produce an in-depth look at the attack, using a unique frame: the 108 hours that elapsed between the start of the race and the capture of the second suspect. Our program aired April 11, 2014 and was the culmination enterprise journalism. The program examined the actual hunt for the suspects through the eyes, and in some cases the gun sights, of those directly involved in the manhunt.
  • Dividing Lines

    This project explored the nature, causes and consequences of political polarization in metropolitan Milwaukee and Wisconsin. It concluded that metropolitan Milwaukee is by some measures the most polarized place in swing-state America; that it has grown more politically segregated with virtually every election cycle since the 1970s; that its voters live overwhelmingly in politically homogenous neighborhoods dominated by a single party; that those communities have been moving systematically in one partisan direction (either red or blue) for more than four decades; that the partisan gap between its urban and outlying communities has been steadily growing; and that this deep and deepening polarization is a consequence of at least three factors: extreme racial segregation, unusually high levels of political engagement and activism; and at least two decades of perpetual partisan conflict and mobilizing as a result of Wisconsin’s political competitiveness, its battleground role in presidential races and the unprecedented turmoil and division over collective bargaining beginning in 2011. We also charted the rise of political segregation nationally, in the ever-growing share of voters in the United States who live in politically one-sided counties. The project also traced the dramatic changes in voting behavior in the state of Wisconsin in recent decades with the demise of ticket-splitting, the rise of extreme party-line voting, and the systematic growth of two political divides – the one between white and nonwhite voters, and the one between densely populated and less densely populated places. The series explored the relationship between Wisconsin’s high and rising political engagement and turnout rates and its deepening partisan divisions. And it explored the consequences of rising polarization and political segregation when it comes to the way campaigns are conducted, the outcomes of elections, the decline in electoral competition, and barriers to regional problem-solving. It found that as a result of partisan and geographic fault lines, the two parties in Wisconsin (and elsewhere) are increasingly drawing their support from different kinds of voters and different kinds of communities, and winning very different kinds of elections.
  • Synthetic Drugs : The Race Against the Chemists

    Our major finding : We found out that synthetic drugs get through Canadian customs quite easily. Most of them legally. The synopsis of our document is attached with our submission. The story started with a number found in a UN Report that grabbed our attention : 58. It’s the number of new psychoactive substances which entered Canada legally, according to a the 2013 report from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crimes. We were able to find a synthetic drug dealer who’s doing business on internet. It was our most significant source. Our source and others targeted by our story revealed how it is possible to get drugs into Canada by simply using the postal service.
  • ATF Gun Tracing

    CBS News obtained exclusive access to the National Tracing Center operated by the Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms in Martinsburg, West Virginia In our piece, we took the public behind the scenes of this massive facility in the heart of rural West Virginia to show how a gun is traced, guns used in crimes such as the Newtown Ct. mass shootings, Aurora, Colorado theater shooting, and that of Congresswoman Gabby Giffords in Arizona.
  • The Puget Sound Puzzle

    As my internship capstone piece, this investigative article was my chance to showcase the research skills and local knowledge that I gained as an intern with Post Defiance, a Tacoma-based online magazine. I saw this project as an opportunity to answer a series of questions I’d been asking since I began attending the University of Puget Sound: Why was the relationship between the university and the surrounding community was so strained? How had it become so? What (if anything) was our new president doing to alleviate the tension? And most of all, why wasn’t anybody talking about it? As one who straddled the line between Puget Sound student and Tacoma local, I offered an invaluable perspective on the topic. With this piece, I am proud to say that I not only answered my initial questions, but I put this seemingly localized story into a much larger context by revealing the broader racial, social and economic forces at work. In so doing, I opened up channels of dialogue within the community that had never before been opened, and likely would have remained closed forever.
  • Boeing’s Lobbying Campaign

    “Boeing’s Lobbying Campaign" uses public records to trace how The Boeing Co.’s lobbying killed a long-overdue correction to an obscure but important formula used to determine how much water pollution is allowed under the Clean Water Act. The lobbying by a Boeing senior executive, InvestigateWest showed, reached all the way to Gov. Christine Gregoire. After the Washington Department of Ecology had withstood challenges to its plans to tighten the water-pollution rules from the powerful timber and business industries during the 2012 legislative session, Boeing had the juice to quietly short-circuit those plans a few months later. The company went around Ecology to the governor, as InvestigateWest’s timeline of documents and emails made clear. Our reporting was carried in newspapers around the state, sparking reporting and editorials by other news organizations on the previously low-profile issue. Environmentalists also cited the series in a lawsuit against the EPA. Because we elevated this issue into public consciousness, reporters were all over the story when Boeing again tried to delay the changes in the 2013 legislative session, nearly causing a government shutdown. A new draft rule tightening the standards is due out in March 2014.
  • Deals for Developers, Cash for Campaigns

    D.C. routinely awards real estate subsidies to encourage development but there has been little scrutiny of them and plenty of questions. For instance, how much have the subsidies cost taxpayers over time and are they really needed when the city has one of the country’s hottest real estate markets? The reporters examined thousands of pages of city documents on 110 developments receiving city subsidies in the past decade and nearly 100,000 campaign contributions for council, mayoral and other local races over that time. The investigation found the city awarded $1.7 billion in subsidies in the past decade — and more than a third went to ten developers that donated the most campaign cash over that time. A dozen developers spent the most campaign cash the year their subsidy was approved and there were 10 dates in which three or more companies developing a project together donated to a single candidate on the same day. What’s more, less than five percent of the subsidies went to the city’s poorest areas with a fourth of the city’s population, and developers failed to deliver on pledged public benefits for at least half the projects examined.
  • Terror in Boston

    When terror struck at the Boston marathon, ABC News Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Team raced to the scene and stayed for weeks, uncovering exclusive details and providing round-the-clock coverage surrounding the plot that tragically took the lives of three innocent people and brought the city of Boston to a standstill for five days. In a series of 17 stories in the week following the explosions, and a total of 35 aired television investigative reports in the month afterwards, Ross and his team reported on every ABC News platform and breaking news report. The team was the first to report that pressure cookers and components of toy remote control cars were used to construct the bombs, intimate details about what bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev wrote right before he was captured, and new leads in the investigation, including a photo of the suspects taken inside a Lord & Taylor department store. Throughout this coverage, the ABC News Investigative Team worked diligently to fact check every detail in this fast-moving investigation. While other news organizations chose to air photos of two potential suspects early on that would then prove not to be correct or in any way connected to the bombing, ABC News chose accuracy over speed, fact-checking over error, resulting in coverage that broke numerous headlines and provided ABC News viewers and readers with up-to-the-moment details and exclusive investigative insight.
  • The mysterious story of the battery startup that promised GM a 200-mile car

    Quartz’s feature, “The mysterious story of the battery startup that promised GM a 200-mile car” by Steve LeVine, is a prime example of the continued vitality of classic reporting methods in investigative news. In this long-form piece, LeVine turns two years of week-by-week reporting for a book into an unusual, blow-by-blow, insider account of alleged fraud. Advances in battery technology are critical to the development of products including smartphones, airplanes, and electric cars—and Silicon Valley’s Envia at one moment was home to the most promising research breakthroughs in the US. But a phone tip told LeVine that matters were not as they seemed, leading him to burrow in on the investigation on which the piece is based. LeVine had been regularly interviewing two of the story’s characters for The Great Battery Race, his latest book, to be published in 2015 by Viking. The executives of a Silicon Valley startup were the book’s positive, climactic finish, a Hollywood ending in which General Motors licensed their technology for a triumphal 200-mile electric car, and the founders launched an IPO and got rich. It was only in September 2013, as LeVine was finishing the book, that he received the phone tip--the executives had fallen out in allegations of fraud, and GM had canceled the license. It is a story of how at least one and possibly both of the executives had fooled everyone—the Obama Administration, GM and the media—into believing they had created an enormous technological breakthrough when they had not.
  • Race project: Racial disparities exist despite changing attitudes

    This small class in data and investigative journalism examined racial disparities over time as part of a collaborative effort between the University of Washington, The Seattle Times and The Pacific Science Center and their Race Project exhibit. Their findings delved into the problems with persistent disparities in race and ethnicity despite changing attitudes.