Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "racial discrimination" ...

  • Policing in America: Five Years after Ferguson

    CBS News’ “Policing in America: Five Years After Ferguson” is a first-of-its-kind investigation into changes that police departments across America say they're making regarding race and policing since the shooting death of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and unrest in Ferguson, Missouri five years ago.
  • Reveal: Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • Driven Into Debt

    This ongoing series of stories — which started at ProPublica Illinois and later was produced in collaboration with WBEZ — exposed how the city of Chicago’s aggressive and unequal ticketing practices, combined with punitive collections measures, have pushed tens of thousands of mostly black motorists into Chapter 13 bankruptcy. The stories have also examined Chicago’s cottage industry of bankruptcy attorneys who profit off consumers with ticket debt, even as their clients often sink even deeper into debt; the racially disparate consequences of license suspensions for unpaid tickets; and an ill-fated decision to hike the price of what was already one of the most expensive tickets in the city.
  • MU's Asian students reluctant to report episodes of discrimination, racism

    The story is to reveal untold stories related to racial discrimination against MU's Asian students. While Na was speaking with more than 100 Asian students and several MU officials who were devising a diversity training that would be mandated for MU freshmen to take, he found several Asian students had undergone obvious racial mistreatment, but were not willing to report; and MU officials did not know of these racial instances suffered among MU Asian students.
  • Houston Texas Bus Safety

    This story looks at two bus crashes in Texas to determine how companies are regulated. It also looks at how Houston operators who cater to Hispanic, working-class passengers are allowed to operate, some illegally, despite poor safety records and questionable licensing.
  • Chicago Matters: Money matters

    These three series; "Chasing the Dream," Paycheck to Paycheck," and "Paper Bag Test," examined how money and financial matters affects different individuals and families around Chicago. "Chasing the Dream" revealed that whites earning less than $30,000 a year had a better chance of getting home loans than blacks earning more than $90,000 a year."Paycheck to Paycheck" revealed that thousands of families don't earn what they need just to meet their basic expenses. "Paper Bag Test" showed that the major retailers have three times the number of outlets in the predominantly white areas of Chicago than in the predominantly black areas.
  • DWP Files

    This series of stories on LA's Department of Water and Power, the nations' largest municipal utility, follows up on Anderson's report last year about racial discrimination at the utility company. He reports on price gouging by suppliers; dysfunctional management and extortion by the unions; whistleblowers being fired; shoddy workmanship and cost overruns.
  • Striking Differences

    This team of reporters spent two years gathering and analyzing jury data from felony court trials to see if racial discrimination still played a key role in jury selection. The investigation found that prosecutors tend to reject African-American jurors, while defense attorneys tended to retain them. Consequently, the number of African-Americans serving on juries in Dallas more or less mirrored the breakdown of the population.
  • Out of the Mainstream: Black students likelier to be put in special ed than whites, data show

    This article shows how, both nationally and in Dallas, minority students are more likely than white students to end up in Special Education classes. "Many teachers and principals say special education helps disadvantaged children catch up with their peers. But some parents and civil rights leaders say minority children get separated from the mainstream and often do not return." This articles examines the numbers and then looks at possible reasons for the discrepancy.