Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "racial profiling" ...

  • Justice is not Blind

    Despite Canada’s dropping crime rate, incarceration rates of Indigenous people have been on the rise. Racial profiling and police brutality claims have increased throughout the Prairies but are often dismissed as isolated incidents by police departments. There is very little available data or research to verify whether or not the complaints are symptomatic of a larger systemic issue. Discourse Media and Maclean’s magazine collaborated on a months long investigation looking into whether the experience of Indigenous university students mirrored racial profiling claims in the Prairies, and to better understand student perceptions of police. Discourse Media designed, administered and analyzed a survey that showed that for those surveyed, Indigenous students have greater odds of being stopped by police than non-Indigenous students — and they believe their race is a factor.
  • Police & Race Relations

    This story delves into police and racial profiling in Amarillo. ABC 7 analyzed all traffic stops from 2015 that resulted in a warning or citation by race. We found that blacks had 10 percent of the traffic stops but made up seven percent of the Amarillo population. Hispanics had 40 percent of the traffic stops but make up 29 percent of the population. This story also looks at why the data might not tell the full story. People self-select their race on their driver’s license and the Census, but officers select a driver’s race during a traffic stop. There is also an issue in data collection because “Hispanic” didn’t become a race option for driver’s licenses until 2013. Previously, Hispanics had to select to be Black or White. Because not all licenses are updated but police must report the number of Hispanic drivers stopped each year, officers have to determine a driver’s race.
  • Racial Profiling Whitewash

    This KXAN investigation uncovered state and local law enforcement agencies wrongly reporting the race of minority drivers during traffic stops. KXAN analyzed more than 16 million Texas Department of Public Safety traffic stop records and revealed the state law enforcement agency systematically under-reported the number of minorities, mostly Hispanics, stopped on Texas roads by state troopers. The investigation questioned the validity of DPS racial profiling reports and led to immediate statewide changes in the way Texas troopers conduct traffic stops and record racial profiling data. KXAN found the same problem in the Austin Police Department which prompted an immediate audit of APD's traffic stop data and race recording practices which found APD in violation of the Texas racial profiling law. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kEG0q7WR1U
  • Police Misconduct Coverage

    The San Diego Police Department was once nationally recognized for its positive relationship with the community. But in recent years, a rash of officer misconduct accusations hit the department. In early 2014, Voice of San Diego investigated SDPD and the coverage produced major revelations. Here are two of the big findings: SDPD missed numerous red flags about a serial sexual predator in the force before his arrest and ultimate conviction on sexual misconduct charges. SDPD used to be a national leader in addressing racial profiling concerns. But the department quietly stopped following its own rules to track profiling in traffic stops – so much so that the sergeant in charge of research and analysis didn’t know the rules existed.
  • Hidden Behind the Badge

    For more than a decade, the New Jersey State Police had to answer to a federal monitor after admissions the force engaged in racial profiling on state highways in the late 1990s. That oversight ended in 2009, but "Hidden Behind the Badge," a yearlong investigation by The Star-Ledger’s Christopher Baxter, showed many of the State Police’s bad habits remain. In a remarkable run of reporting throughout 2012, Baxter exposed actions by troopers that shocked the public, drew national attention, prompted unprecedented shakeups of top brass and spurred new state investigations, suspensions, criminal charges and legislation. He also got the attention of New Jersey’s most powerful political leaders by digging into how the State Police operates, showing whistleblowers fear career-killing reprisals for speaking up, proving the promotion system is more subjective than nearly any other in the country and raising questions about training to recognize diabetic shock.
  • Ticket Inequality

    After racial-profiling allegations in one town led to state and federal investigations of the local police department, we set out to investigate whether minority motorists faced similar discrimination elsewhere in the state. In a first-ever analysis of traffic-stop data recorded by local police departments, we found that black and Hispanic motorists pulled over by police were significantly more likely to be ticketed than white motorists pulled over the same offense.
  • The Henry Louis Gates Jr. Case: Racial Profiling or Stifling Free Speech

    When police arrested Henry Louis Gates Jr. for disorderly conduct in his own home, Gates claimed he was a victim of racial profiling. NECIR analyzed five years of arrest records from the Cambridge Police Department for disorderly conduct which did not seem to indicate a pattern of racial profiling. The results showed that more white people than black people had been arrested for disorderly conduct by the department.
  • Racial Profiling

    The two day series attempted to determine if the practice of targeting citizens based on their race was being used by area law enforcement. Their findings included: Black drivers in Sheveport and nearby Bossier City were cited for traffic violations more than twice as often as white drivers, based on traffic citation data over nearly five years. Although black divers were a minority of each city's licensed drivers, they were disproportionally cited for lower-level violations, such as window tint or loud music. Several officers from each city police department routinely issued more tickets to black drivers and issued more tickets for lower-level violations that for serious infractions, such as speeding or running a red light.
  • Too Tough? Tactics in Suburban Policing

    Some police departments in the Philadelphia area have been recording some of the highest arrest rates in American for minor offenses. These towns are mostly white, and the high number of arrests are made up overwhelmingly of African Americans. Legal experts say some of the arrests are unconstitutional. Furthermore, the towns with the highest arrest rates have actually seen crime go up, not down.
  • Small Town Justice

    A Haitian truck driver, Jean Claude Meus, was convicted of vehicular homicide after a semi he was driving turned over and fell on a minivan, killing a mother and daughter. While no drugs or alcohol were present in his system at the time of the accident, prosecutors were able to push a conviction based on their assertion that he had fallen asleep at the wheel, and was thus driving recklessly. But WTVT-TV investigators "found convincing evidence that (he) did not fall asleep, and in fact, was trying to avoid an accident." An off-duty firefighter was a witness at the scene, and asserted that Meus was "alert and helpful immediately after the crash." Yet the lead investigator, who attended high school with victim Nona Moore, never interview Juan Otero, the off-duty firefighter. With the help of experts, WTVT reconstructed the crash, and the conclusion drawn was that Meus had turned off the road to avoid an obstruction. Further, WTVT spoke with jurors who said that with that new evidence, they would not have voted to convict.