Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "recession" ...

  • How Cash Sent the Portland Housing Market Spinning

    Cash is king in red-hot Portland real estate, representing a full one-third of single-family home sales in 2014. Lee van der Voo’s seven-part series on the Portland housing market has uncovered in stark outline the often-obscured influence of cash from developers, foreign buyers and Wall Street in driving affordable housing from the city. Twenty-six investors who purchased more than 10 homes for cash in the listed market in Multnomah County through the recession. Average Black and Native American households priced out of the city. A publicly traded company that is renting out more than 200 Portland-area homes in a new twist on the asset-securitization that drove the Great Recession. The pension funds of teachers and police officers invested in cash-rich Wall Street landlords who compete on the housing market with the very middle-class professionals whose pensions they hold. With van der Voo’s reporting, an economic crisis that everyone in town talked about but no one could explain was given names, faces and numbers — and a hope of being fixed.
  • Instability Trap

    Years after supposedly emerging from the recession unscathed, Canadians are tapped out and falling off the radar: Participation rates have hit historic lows, especially for working-age men; many people who've found themselves out of work have given up on looking. Others find themselves in increasingly precarious work – bouncing from contract to contract, juggling multiple gigs without benefits. Our research revealed for the first time the way asset poverty is making households vulnerable to sudden economic shocks, and the way payday lenders and cheque-cashing outlets continue to proliferate in the poorest urban areas of the country. The response to our series was resounding: We were inundated with personal stories from people across the country who'd struggled with precarious work, penurious social assistance restrictions and predatory lending. For months we followed up our revelatory reporting with new information and reality checks on political claims and promises. We continue to do that. http://globalnews.ca/tag/instability-trap/
  • Repossessing boats and cars when their owners don't pay for them

    While the recession means hard times for most businesses, the repossession industry is soaring, especially in South Florida, where many boats are repossessed.
  • Downtown Reno blight

    Downtown Reno, Nev. was devastated by the recession and though the recession is considered over, much of the city's core remains vacant and blighted. A three-part series - preview video, call to action and investigative piece - published throughout a week in November addressing the issue of downtown blight. http://www.rgj.com/videos/news/2015/11/16/75602720/ http://www.rgj.com/story/news/2015/11/19/why-so-long-clean-up-downtown-reno-blight/75627500/ http://www.rgj.com/story/news/2015/11/17/how-fight-blight-reno/74288332/
  • Destroying the Center for Building Hope

    Members of the board of directors of a Sarasota cancer charity went out of their way to hire a businessman with a history of self dealing, bankruptcy and failed business ventures to head up their organization and find novel ways of raising money during the Great Recession. The results were predictable. Carl Ritter put his interests ahead of cancer patients and their families and the Center of Building Hope was forced to shut down three months after Jessica Floum’s initial story.
  • The Lost Bank

    "The Lost Bank" deals with the issue of the 2007-2008 financial crisis and how the bank failed to prevent an economic recession.
  • Pension Crisis

    Jacksonville’s Police and Fire Pension Fund is in crisis. The fund has about 43 cents available for every dollar promised to its retired police officers and fire fighters. Now $2.88 billion, the multiplying city debt is threatening the city’s financial stability. Bond ratings have been downgraded. City projects have been scuttled. Bankruptcy is feared. The recent recession isn’t the only thing that crippled the fund. Deals done in secret, deals hidden for more than a decade and sweetheart deals that allowed a select few to skirt regulations and retire from public service jobs with hundreds of thousands of extra dollars they weren’t entitled to are also to blame.
  • Temporary Workers, Permanent Insecurity

    The investigation into the issue of workplace safety of temporary workers emerged as a joint investigation between ProPublica and Univision News' investigative unit. Univision's investigative unit then continued investigating and exposed different cases of injured temp workers, including the death of a temp worker in a sugar plant. Blue-collar temp work is the fastest-growing and more dangerous segment of the U.S. labor market. Since the 2008 recession, companies have increasingly turned to temporary employees to work in factories and warehouses and on construction sites. In some states, temp workers are six times as likely to be injured than permanent employees doing similar jobs.
  • Temporary Work, Lasting Harm

    Temp employment is climbing to record levels following the Great Recession. The system benefits brand-name companies but harms American workers through lost wages, high injury rates, few if any benefits, and little opportunity for advancement.
  • The Untouchables

    In the aftermath of the financial crisis, Americans demanded to know why no Wall Street banks or senior executives had faced criminal charges. Critics questioned whether, in the midst of a painful recovery, Wall Street was simply “too big to jail.” With the five-year statute of limitations approaching, FRONTLINE producer Martin Smith sought answers to these questions in the film The Untouchables: an investigation into whether the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) failed to act on evidence that Wall Street knowingly originated, packaged and sold toxic home loans that poisoned the global economy.