Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "school bus" ...

  • Yemen's War: Made in America

    When a Saudi air strike hit a school bus in August killing 40 children, CNN’s Nima Elbagir was ahead of her competitors in covering the event from London using footage and information from a cadre of carefully vetted Yemen-based journalists. Using this local network, and with the consultation of weapons experts, Nima and her team proved the bomb used in the attack was US-made. Then they went further and obtained exclusive access to documentation on a string of other civilian bombings in Yemen, proving that in many cases the rain of death in Yemen is made in America.
  • The Daily News: Yellow School Bus Crisis

    This Daily News series dealt with yellow school buses and a crisis that included extensive delays, fraud in hiring bus staffers with criminal pasts, and how bus contracts were awarded.
  • School Buses Flunk

    The safety inspections of 30,000 Connecticut school buses showed that one in four buses was unfit to carry children, yet state officials ignored this issue.
  • Bus-ted

    The story reveals a number of things about a school district’s bus system. Some of the things revealed are school buses breaking traffic laws, and extensive records of the bus drivers, including traffic violations and speeding tickets. Once the findings were revealed, the school district wasn’t sure who hired them and the school district allowed them to be bus drivers as long as the insurance companies approved them.
  • "Beyond the Verdict"

    After a minivan struck a school bus causing a wreck that killed four children, Olga Franco was accused of driving the van, convicted and sentenced to prison. Franco, an illegal immigrant from Guatemala, maintains her innocence and says her then-boyfriend was operating the vehicle; however, he was not found in the vehicle when authorities arrived to the scene. The KMSP team investigates her claims to determine if the wrong person is in prison for the terrible tragedy.
  • Broken Buses

    This series of investigations revealed serious, recurring and widespread safety violations involving hundreds of school buses used to transport nearly 20,000 children to Indianapolis-area schools, and the expanded to show critical safety problems affecting thousands of buses in school districts across Indiana. The investigation exposed problems not only with the school buses, but also identified gaping deficiencies in the Indiana State Police bus inspection program. It triggered immediate and dramatic action, prompted Indiana's largest school districts to call for more stringent oversight and more frequent inspections and provided parents with a hands-on tool to monitor the safety history of their children's school buses.
  • Who's Driving Your Kids?

    KOMO investigated rumors of school bus drivers behind the wheel without valid driver's licenses. The school district operates on the honor system, relying on drivers to tell their superiors about moving infractions.
  • Sex Offenders Near Bus Stops

    WTEV-TV found that sex offenders in Duval County, Florida, were living in areas surrounding school bus stops, often within two blocks. This included offenders who had targeted children.
  • Dialing While Driving

    Raleigh school bus drivers were violating a school district policy banning cell-phone use while driving.
  • School Bus Disgrace

    This investigation exposed abuse, neglect and corruption in New York City's school bus system. The reporters found cases of students being sexually abused on buses, of buses breaking down, and of special needs children being mistreated. The investigation revealed that the Department of Education had no way to track repeat offenders, and often punished misbehaving drivers with little more than a verbal reprimand.