Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "sex crimes" ...

  • Accused: The R. Kelly Story

    In this powerful prime-time special, “Dateline NBC” delved into the multiple allegations of sexual abuse that have been made against R. Kelly and asked why the documentary, “Surviving R. Kelly,” was able to do something the music industry and the national media never had: hold R. Kelly to account.
  • CNN: "Destroyed"

    Destroyed is a multimedia investigation that revealed law enforcement agencies nationwide have destroyed rape kit evidence before the statutes of limitations expired to prosecute reported sex crimes. CNN found that the destruction of this evidence happened after flawed and incomplete police investigations. The project spurred immediate action from lawmakers and other leaders seeking to protect rape kits from destruction.
  • Rape Victim Jailed: Jenny's Story

    A mentally ill rape victim who had a breakdown on the witness stand while testifying against her attacker was thrown in jail by the Harris County District Attorney's Office for nearly a month. Prosecutors worried she would not return weeks later to complete her testimony. The prosecutor’s conduct and the abuse the rape victim was subjected to in jail was exposed by the reporters. The reporters exposed a series of mistakes by jail staff that further victimized the woman. The outrage and fallout from their reporting quickly became the central campaign issue in the race for Harris County District Attorney between incumbent Devon Anderson and challenger Kim Ogg. On election night, Ogg defeated Anderson by a 7 point margin and cited the “Jenny” story as the defining issue of the campaign in her acceptance speech. Ogg fired the prosecutor who handled the case and started a new sex crimes unit to protect victims and witnesses. State senators on both sides of the aisle filed new legislation for the 2017 session to mandate legal representation for witnesses held on bonds for their testimony, a statewide solution to the problem the reporters exposed.
  • Child Predators in the Military

    Over six months of reporting, including filing numerous federal Freedom of Information Act requests and appeals to unearth details of scores of cases, The Associated Press found that the largest category of criminals in the military prison system are in for sex crimes against children. It also found that harsh sentences announced publicly were substantially reduced under plea agreements that were not routinely disclosed, and that military proceedings are opaque compared with the degree of openness of civilian courts. The lack of transparency made accessing the records needed for this story a significant challenge. http://www.sfgate.com/news/item/AP-interactive-Military-child-sex-assaults-48405.php
  • Violation of Trust

    A Belleville News-Democrat investigation found that out of 6,744 felony sex crimes reported by victims to police from 2005-2013 in 32 Southern Illinois counties, 70 percent were not prosecuted. And when they were, fewer than one in 10 suspects ever went to prison. Prosecutors blamed police, saying most of the cases they received did not have enough evidence to secure a conviction. http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index2.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index3.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index4.html
  • Betrayed by the Badge

    A yearlong Associated Press investigation uncovered about 1,000 officers in six years who were pushed out of law enforcement for conduct that the AP found included sexual assault, sex crimes such as possessing child pornography and misconduct that ranged from propositioning citizens to consensual but prohibited on-duty intercourse. https://interactives.ap.org/2015/betrayed-by-the-badge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhJfoSvASMU
  • Abusing the Law

    Sexual abuse by police officers is a pervasive problem. An officer in America wields his power or status for sexual gratification every five days, on average. Those are the ones who are caught. The actual numbers are almost certainly higher because sex crimes go widely unreported, even when the suspects are not cops. The Buffalo News compiled a database of more than 700 cases of police sexual abuse or misconduct and analyzed the variables. Typical offenders were not rookies. They had almost a decade of experience with their departments. In a surprising number of cases, children and adolescents were their targets.
  • There’s not a list

    Under Colorado’s “lifetime” sentencing laws, sex offenders were supposed to remain in prison until they successfully completed a rigorous mental/behavioral health program. The intent was to fully rehabilitate them and prevent recidivism. Through months of research, 9Wants to Know also uncovered names of offenders who committed new sex crimes after release. Even after we provided those names to DOC, a prison official publicly claimed, “There’s not a list,” and the recidivism rate was zero. As a result of our investigation, DOC could no longer be in denial. The sex offender treatment program manager was replaced, and prison officials are changing the program rules and asking for more state funding.
  • Theme Parks Investigation

    At least 35 Walt Disney World employees have been arrested since 2006 and accused of sex crimes involving children, trying to meet a minor for sex, or for possession of child pornography, according to a six-month CNN investigation that examined police and court records, and interviewed law enforcement officials and some of the men who have been arrested.
  • MCSO Sex Crimes Unit Investigation

    We uncovered that Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Sex Crimes Unit detectives failed to investigate hundreds of sex crimes cases. Not only were hundreds not investigated, but many were cleared in a way so they would be reported along with arrest numbers giving the public the appearance the cases were solved.