Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "sexual violence" ...

  • The Deerfield Scroll: Gender discrimination and sexual violence alleged at elite boarding school

    Two respected teachers - also husband and wife - left our school abruptly with little public explanation. I investigated their departure and learned that the female teacher had filed an explosive lawsuit against my school alleging a years-long pattern of sexual discrimination and of alleged sexual violence against female students. I was under tremendous pressure by some faculty members and others to drop the story but I was determined to get it published so that my school could confront the serious issues raised in the litigation.
  • BETRAYED: Chicago schools fail to protect students from sexual abuse and assault, leaving lasting damage

    In “Betrayed,” Tribune reporters for the first time quantified the staggering prevalence of sexual violence against students in a large U.S. school district. Using confidential records, innovative data analysis and sensitive interviews with young people, the team discovered and verified 523 times when police investigated a case of sexual assault or abuse of a child inside a Chicago public school in the last decade. Reporters told the wrenching stories of young victims and uncovered child-protection failures that extended from neighborhood schools to the district's downtown offices and the state capital. For years, media outlets attempted to measure the problem of sexual violence against students by examining the cases of disciplined educators or those convicted of crimes. But those efforts failed to account for cases where students are abused by peers or the adult abuser was not punished. By pursuing crimes against students that were documented in police records, the Tribune shed light on a hidden injustice. The reporting proved to be a catalyst for change, leading to massive reforms by district officials, 12 state reform bills and enforcement efforts by the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights.
  • Sex offenses on campus

    This story uncovered the causes for an incredibly low rate of reporting and prosecution for sex offenses at the University of Missouri. As many people know, universities have especially high rates of sexual victimization, such as rape, and especially low rates of prosecution for those crimes. My investigation, which took more than a year because of resistance from campus officials, revealed that only two sex offenses were ever reported to the student disciplinary office in 2012. Sexual violence survey data suggests the actual number of violations was more likely in the thousands, and nearly 100 violations were reported to campus police or the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center. Throughout my reporting I discovered legal barriers, indifference among law enforcement, lack of communication and social phenomena that all contribute to this incredibly low rate. The article showed that prosecution for sex offenses at the University of Missouri is extremely rare, perhaps even more rare than prosecution in the state court system.
  • Sex offenses on campus

    This story uncovered the causes for an incredibly low rate of reporting and prosecution for sex offenses at the University of Missouri. As many people know, universities have especially high rates of sexual victimization, such as rape, and especially low rates of prosecution for those crimes. My investigation, which took more than a year because of resistance from campus officials, revealed that only two sex offenses were ever reported to the student disciplinary office in 2012. Sexual violence survey data suggests the actual number of violations was more likely in the thousands, and nearly 100 violations were reported to campus police or the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center. Throughout my reporting I discovered legal barriers, indifference among law enforcement, lack of communication and social phenomena that all contribute to this incredibly low rate. The article showed that prosecution for sex offenses at the University of Missouri is extremely rare, perhaps even more rare than prosecution in the state court system.
  • Corrective Rape

    This story by ESPN highlights the notion of "corrective rape" in South Africa, where "men rape women to 'cure' them of their lesbianism." The 2008 rape and murder of former soccer player Eudy Simelane spurred an entire investigation into the practice of "corrective rape" in and around South Africa. The country continues to struggle with "sexual violence and homophobia."
  • Victims of Silence

    The story reviews dating violence in Florida, as well as the beating of Rihanna by boyfriend Chris Brown. This revealed a number of issues, including “lack of prevention programs, the impact this news had, and that dating violence is under the domestic violence law only to ask for injunction and protection orders”. Further, dating violence isn’t considered a crime and many times is underreported after a physical attack.
  • "Sexual Assault on Campus: A Frustrating Search for Justice"

    Unfortunately, sexual assault occurs on campuses all over the U.S. For the small number of those who come forward to report the act, institutional policies can often make the process toward accountability difficult, sometimes even causing the victim to drop the claim. The Center for Public Integrity finds that most university policies are lacking in "transparency" and often lead to less the harsh punishment for the accused attackers.
  • BBCHS Wrestling Investigation

    Four members of the Bradley-Bourbonnais Community High School wrestling team are caught engaging in violent sexual hazing of another member at a motel.
  • "Uncertain Innocence: What Convicted Sue Reser"

    This story is about the conviction of Pamela Sue Reser. She was sentenced to life in prison for sexual violence against her own children. After spending 3 1/2 years in prison, her kids recanted the testimony that put her in prison. An order by the judge set her free, and the charges were dismissed a month later. Her kids alleged that their adoptive mother's brother had done the molesting. He had brainwashed the kids into believing Reser had sexually abused them. The charges against their uncle were dismissed.
  • Gay Murders

    An investigation into a new and deadly pattern of anti-homosexual violence emerging nation-wide. In Dupont Circle, D.C.'s gay community, there have been more than 30 murders in five years, 12 in the last year alone. Most murders are still unsolved. The I-Team also investigates a series of gay murders in Norfolk, Va. (May 2 - 4 & 24, 1995)