Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "special interests" ...

  • The Center for Public Integrity: Tax Breaks: The Favored Few

    In February 2018, Congress passed a massive budget bill, and President Donald Trump signed it. It provided new money for the military. It funded disaster relief efforts. And it raised the nation’s “debt ceiling” — allowing the government to secure new loans. While these provisions grabbed headlines amid the chaos of what was, at best, a slapdash scramble to pass a budget and avert another government shutdown, a gaggle of goodies, benefiting a bevy of special interests, slipped into the bill’s 652 pages almost unnoticed. These goodies are called “tax extenders.” Seeing an opportunity to boldly tell an effectively untold tale, the staff of the Center for Public Integrity endeavored to explain how every tax extender — more than 30 in all — came to fruition and reveal how lobbyists gamed the political system and squeezed $16 billion worth of special favors from it. This project represented a rare example of deep investigative reporting on Congress. While hundred of reporters cover what Mitch MCConnell and Nancy Pelosi said yesterday, very few unravel how the institution of Congress is corrupted.
  • The Daily Beast: Pay Dirt

    Pay Dirt is a weekly newsletter covering campaign finance, political influence, and corruption. These six stories, each of which led the newsletter for that day, covered a range of topics that shed light on the special interests trying to buy elections and influence American policymaking.
  • Fixed Fortunes: Biggest corporate political interests spend billions, get trillions

    In the era of billion-dollar presidential campaigns and political groups that can raise donations in unlimited amounts from almost any source, we are used to reading stories about the large amounts of money that special interests invest in politics. But what do they get out of the government they spend so much trying to influence by supporting political campaigns and parties or hiring well-connected lobbyists?
  • Following political money in a post-Citizens United world

    The Center for Public Integrity’s “Following political money in a post-Citizens United world” project was produced to help people understand which special interests are trying to influence U.S. elections, specifically by tracking the entities saturating television airwaves ahead of the 2014 elections and by following the money flowing from corporations to politically active nonprofits that generally do not disclose their donors. Together, the Center for Public Integrity’s widely used “Who’s Buying the Senate?” and “Who’s Calling the Shots in the States?” web apps allowed journalists and the General public to see what groups and power players were behind more than 2.5 million TV ads that aired in U.S. Senate races, statewide ballot measures and state-level contests such as gubernatorial elections and state Supreme Court races. Separately, the Center for Public Integrity’s seven-month-long analysis of voluntary corporate filings uncovered more than $173 million given to politically active nonprofits — such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce — that have been major players in elections and public policy battles.
  • Election 2014: Big Money, Secret Money

    In “Election 2014: Big Money, Secret Money,” the Center for Public Integrity tracked the impact and role of political advertising ahead of the Nov. 4 elections to help voters interpret special-interest influence on state-level and U.S. Senate elections in real time. Our unique project analyzed TV advertising for state-level races, statewide ballot measures and the battle over the U.S. Senate before voters went to the polls, then analyzed the results of those races as the election returns came in on Nov. 4. The stories we produced shined a light on what were essentially shadow campaigns occurring in races up and down the ballot, where outside groups and special interests spent millions of dollars independently of candidates and political parties to influence the outcomes.
  • Who’s calling the shots in U.S. elections? How big money and secret contributions influence politics

    The Center for Public Integrity “Who’s calling the shots in U.S. elections? How big money and secret contributions influence politics” was produced to help people understand which special interests are trying to influence U.S. elections and the political process. The series tracked where the money was coming from and where it was going. It also looked at how the government regulates this new territory in the post-Citizens United era when nonprofits that don’t publicly disclose their donors can take on unprecedented political roles.
  • Fixed Fortunes

    In the era of billion-dollar presidential campaigns and political groups that can raise donations in unlimited amounts from almost any source, we are used to reading stories about the large amounts of money that special interests invest in politics. But what do they get out of the government they spend so much trying to influence by supporting political campaigns and parties or hiring well-connected lobbyists? Bill Allison and Sarah Harkins set out to answer that question, compiling huge amounts of data from multiple federal sources, identifying the biggest corporate political donors over a six year period, and then compiling numbers on the various federal support -- contracts, grants, loans, loan guarantees and various programs adopted in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis -- to attempt to show what the biggest donors get from the federal government.
  • State of Neglect

    The state of Texas, which is one of the nation’s wealthiest states, is faced with low rankings in social benefits. These benefits include “assistance to poor children and the malnourished, treatment of the mentally ill, care of the disabled and many other social indicators”. This series reveals special interests are being heard and are shaping laws and decisions in the state of Texas.
  • Bosnia-Herzegovina Politicians' Assets

    By law, Bosnian politicians are required to disclose their assets. When the Center for Investigative Reporting in Sarajevo explored financial records of individual politicians, small unreported private fortunes were uncovered. Corporate kickbacks from special interests were found as well.
  • The DeParle Portfolio

    "The DeParle Portfolio" explore the Obama administration's health czar's moneyed connections with the health care industry.