Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "state regulations" ...

  • Tangled up in debt

    In late 2017, The Hechinger Report began a deep dive into cosmetology education in Iowa, an education marketplace that has long eluded scrutiny and whose graduates comprise a poorly paid and “invisible” workforce. For-profit beauty schools have maintained a near-monopoly on the sector and kept state regulations to their liking, and where, despite the schools’ hefty price tags, student earnings years after graduation often remain low. The story was a collaboration with The New York Times.
  • Insight with John Ferrugia: Protecting the Vulnerable

    The Rocky Mountain PBS investigation, Protecting the Vulnerable, brought various cases of abuse, neglect, and mistreatment of intellectually disabled adults to the attention of state and local officials as well as community advocates, prompting them to improve the safety of Colorado’s host home system by reviewing and enhancing state regulations and working to develop new legislation.
  • Trouble on the Tracks

    The NEWS4 I-Team in Washington, DC uncovered a staggering number of horse deaths at a major thoroughbred racing track in the area. Using never before seen video, surveillance and exclusive interviews the investigation gave viewers an inside look at the dark side of horse racing. The series led to new state regulations and Congressional reaction of what's known as the "Sport of Kings". The digital timeline we created of the deaths from 2014-2016 also became a reference guide for the public and stakeholders in the industry.
  • Trouble on the Tracks

    The NEWS4 I-Team in Washington, DC uncovered a staggering number of horse deaths at a major thoroughbred racing track in the area. Using never before seen video, surveillance and exclusive interviews the investigation gave viewers an inside look at the dark side of horse racing. The series led to new state regulations and Congressional reaction of what's known as the "Sport of Kings". The digital timeline we created of the deaths from 2014-2016 also became a reference guide for the public and stakeholders in the industry. http://www.nbcwashington.com/investigations/160-Racehorses-Died-From-Injuries-at-Charles-Town-Races-Since-2014-390369632.html http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/Behind-the-Scenes-Disputes-Between-W_Va_-Racing-Officials-and-Charles-Town-Races_Washington-DC-390508531.html http://www.nbcwashington.com/investigations/Renewed-Calls-for-Strict-Federal-Oversight-of-Thoroughbred-Horse-Racing-392941291.html http://www.nbcwashington.com/investigations/Horse-Racing-Safety-Reviews-Ordered-in-West-Virginia_Washington-DC-394516851.html
  • The Dilbit Disaster

    The 10 stories we’ve submitted expose serious flaws in federal and state regulations that are supposed to ensure the safety of the nation’s oil pipelines. These flaws are of particular concern right now, because the regulations are setting the standards for thousands of miles of new pipelines that are being built or repurposed to carry heavy crude oil from Canada’s tar sands region. U.S. imports of this type of oil, which is turned into a fuel known as dilbit, are expected to quadruple in the coming decade. The core of our reporting is a three-part narrative about a 2010 pipeline accident in Michigan, “The Dilbit Disaster: Inside The Biggest Oil Spill You’ve Never Heard Of,” which also appeared as an e-book. In the other stories that appeared during our 15-month investigation, we applied what we learned from that disaster to the proposed pipeline projects, including the Keystone XL and the replacement of the Michigan pipeline that ruptured in 2010.
  • Moonlight Patrol

    After a grueling odyssey through the Pennslyvania courts, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review and the Associated Press obtained heavily redacted copies of 1,038 supplemental employment forms filed over the previous six and a half years by state troopers and the agency's civilian employees. Despite assurances to the contrary, the Trib uncovered numerous violations of statute and state regulations regarding the after-hours employment of the police.
  • Little Known Colleges Exploit Loopholes to Make Millions Off Foreign Students

    The Chronicle found numerous colleges -- most of them unaccredited -- exploit byzantine federal regulations, enrolling almost exclusively foreign students and charging them upward $3,000 for a chance to work legally in the United States. Enabled by lax state regulations, these colleges usher in thousands of foreign students and generate millions of dollars in profit because they have the power, bestowed by the U.S. government, to help students get visas.
  • Las Vegas Construction Deaths

    Workers had been dying at a rate of one every six weeks -- 12 deaths in 18 months -- until contractors made sweeping safety improvements after the Las Vegas Sun revealed that poor safety practices and lax oversight by state regulators had contributed to the fatalities. Before the story, construction safety had been a non-issue in Las Vegas. The deaths were considered the cost of doing business in a $32 billion building boom, the biggest in Las Vegas history. High-rise construction is dangerous, authorities said. Contractors and state regulators blamed many of the accidents on the dead workers themselves. This investigation found those arguments were "plainly wrong."
  • Pharmacy Fakes

    With this article, SELF Magazine broke the story of adulterated and counterfeit prescription drugs entering America's pharmacies. The article revealed for the first time, that counterfeiters had systematically infiltrated the domestic drug supply, gaining access to fragile medicines and diluting or falsely relabeling them in order to reap a high profit. They exposed how most of the nation's medicine passes through a vast gray market of wholesalers, and how weak enforcement of federal and state regulations makes it close to impossible to identify where our medicine has come from. The article contains personal accounts from patients who had been harmed by counterfeit medicine, and a report on a Florida investigation which had uncovered potential misconduct at 50 of the state's wholesale companies.
  • Assisted Living at Any Cost

    An overview of Assisted Living Concepts, its founder, Keren Brown Wilson and the struggle between care and quality for the services offered to the elderly. The investigation documented the accounting practices of the firm, episodes of neglect and abuse at facilities nationwide, death toll among residents and also a look to federal and state regulations concerning assisted living.