Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "state regulators" ...

  • Unlicensed, Unpunished

    A single tip led the investigative team at Denver7 to uncover unlicensed, untrained and often unpunished health care workers diagnosing and treating vulnerable, sick and disadvantaged Coloradans. The team’s work led to criminal investigations, forced Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to intervene in the matter directly, and prompted state regulators to rewrite and reprioritize their policies. It represents a textbook case of journalists holding the powerful accountable by identifying fundamental problems in the institutions designed to keep consumers safe. Hickenlooper credited Denver7 for "actually making the community safer."
  • Houston Chronicle: Silent Spills

    A joint investigation by the two news organizations (Houston Chronicle and AP)found that industrial spills unleashed by Hurricane Harvey in Houston were far worse than publicly reported. Impacted citizens were kept in the dark about their size and seriousness. State and federal officials misled the public with repeated assurances that no health hazards existed. Six months after Harvey, Texas regulators had not announced a single enforcement action from 89 incidents investigated. Reporters from the Chronicle and AP filed dozens of records requests, unearthing long-hidden government-funded research and cross-referencing spill data collected from a hodgepodge of state and local agencies to determine the true scope of the damage. The vital watchdog role they performed highlighted a lack of will by Texas state regulators to effectively police the petrochemical industry. But its industry-friendly approach had weakened local efforts to build cases against the worst polluters, many of them repeat environmental offenders.
  • Power Price Spike; State Takes Action

    In this half-hour special, the I-Team re-visits some of its more than 40 stories during 2018, investigating Maine's largest utility company and a mysterious spike in usage. Thousands of Central Maine Power customers said their bills doubled or tripled and they couldn't figure out why. The I-Team asked to see those bills and hundreds of customers submitted copies. The I-Team spent days analyzing those bills and provided the data and analysis to state regulators. Hours after the data was turned over, state regulators launched an investigation.
  • The Shale Bargain

    The Shale Bargain uncovered systemic failures on the part of state regulators to enforce environmental, health and safety standards for the multi-billion-dollar drilling industry. http://topics.pennlive.com/tag/the-shale-bargain/
  • Something In The Water

    For years, the state of Texas has said there is no link between water contamination and natural gas drilling. WFAA’s “Something In The Water” series has made it difficult for the state to maintain that stance. Our series, which is still ongoing in 2016, focuses on how a fireball erupted from a rural family’s water well in the Barnett Shale natural gas field. Our investigation found gas drillers not properly cementing their wells to protect underground water, and fudging permitting paperwork with state regulators. Our stories have prompted a board of top EPA scientists to now question whether drilling is linked to contamination. https://vimeo.com/wfaa/review/151843222/9cb971b521
  • Coal Concerns

    Dozens of families living near a power plant say a giant pile of coal outside the plant is making them sick. In a year-long investigation the I-Team's Jermont Terry looks into the families' claims and takes their calls for better regulation to both the power company and state regulators. https://youtu.be/wVwesrOMT4M
  • Toxic Pesticides and Latino Schools

    Our investigation showed that California state regulators knowingly allowed majority-Latino communities and school districts to be disproportionately dosed with toxic pesticides.
  • Tainted Legacy

    "Legacy lawsuits" have cost oil companies hundreds of millions of dollars in Louisiana to clean up decades of contamination after state regulators turned a blind eye. Landowners and their attorneys say the lawsuits are the only way to get oilfield polluters to clean up their mess. The industry says the lawsuits are frivolous money grabs, used by greedy plaintiffs to dig deep into the pockets of Big Oil. We revealed that after hundreds of lawsuits, and hundreds of millions of dollars in judgments and settlements, only 12 sites have been cleaned up.
  • Nursing homes unmasked

    An investigation into who owns California nursing homes; how nursing homes often hide ownership information; how the same problems often persist across nursing home ownership chains and how state regulators consistently focus on single homes instead of chains.
  • Death in the Ring

    After 24-year-old Dennis Munson Jr. of Milwaukee collapsed following his first amateur kickboxing match in March, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter John Diedrich got a tip and started digging into what happened. What he uncovered was a series of errors by fight officials in an unregulated bout. The ringside doctor, referee and coach in the corner all missed obvious signs that Munson was in serious trouble, according to a dozen independent experts who reviewed the fight video for the Journal Sentinel. The doctor was looking at his cell phone when he should have been monitoring the fighters. The corner man propped up Munson between rounds and slapped him in the face and was holding him by the neck and face just before he collapsed. And the referee did not intervene to assess Munson. Medical care was delayed over a disagreement on care and confusion about how to get out of the building. Emergency medical protocol was not followed. And then video of the fight, provided to police, was missing 32 seconds at a key time, just before Munson collapsed. The Journal Sentinel investigation uncovered more problems in unregulated kickboxing in Wisconsin. For instance, state regulators attended a match at a Harley-Davidson dealership — but only to oversee boxing events.