Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "state trooper" ...

  • The Death of a State Trooper

    Early on a Saturday morning in late March of 2019, a man drove the wrong way down a suburban Chicago expressway and crashed into another driver, killing them both. It’s the kind of news story that – unfortunately -- we all report too often. It’s also the kind of story that NBC5 Investigates regularly checks out, to see what might be behind the breaking news. In this case, we quickly discovered a man – Dan Davies -- who should never have been on the road, because of a system that simply (and repeatedly) didn’t work, eventually resulting in that early- morning crash. The man Davies killed: An Illinois State Trooper named Gerald Ellis, who was heading home to his family after his late-night shift. One witness at the scene said Trooper Ellis saved the lives of others, by steering into Davies’ oncoming car. Nearly every day over the two weeks following that fatal crash, NBC5 Investigates uncovered new court records and police reports, blood-alcohol analyses and dash cam video, social-media posts and States Attorney documents, all adding to a damning pile of evidence showing that Davies should have been behind bars the night of the crash, save for a series of mistakes by the Cook County State’s Attorney’s office. Yet, every day, when we tried to get answers from that State’s Attorney, Kim Foxx, there was only radio silence. The lack of response was so galling – especially from a taxpayer-funded office accountable to the public -- that we documented, online and in real time, the actual reporting process of our daily phone calls and emails, which simply sought the most basic answers on what her office did and didn’t do, in a case that clearly and ultimately resulted in the unnecessary death of an Illinois State trooper. Ultimately, Foxx was forced to respond and – finally – take responsibility for the mistakes that allowed Dan Davies to be on the road that night.
  • Charity Cheats?

    A Texas agency that disguises itself as a charity for troopers is actually a union collecting money to lobby politicians in Austin.
  • Racial Profiling Whitewash

    This KXAN investigation uncovered state and local law enforcement agencies wrongly reporting the race of minority drivers during traffic stops. KXAN analyzed more than 16 million Texas Department of Public Safety traffic stop records and revealed the state law enforcement agency systematically under-reported the number of minorities, mostly Hispanics, stopped on Texas roads by state troopers. The investigation questioned the validity of DPS racial profiling reports and led to immediate statewide changes in the way Texas troopers conduct traffic stops and record racial profiling data. KXAN found the same problem in the Austin Police Department which prompted an immediate audit of APD's traffic stop data and race recording practices which found APD in violation of the Texas racial profiling law. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kEG0q7WR1U
  • What killed Kenwin Garcia?

    To most in New Jersey, Kenwin Garcia, a 25-year-old from Newark, was invisible. He had no job, no kids, and spent most days in his room at his father’s house listening to reggae. So when he died in 2008 after being restrained by state troopers on the side of a busy highway, few gave the incident more than passing notice. During the next six years, the story of Garcia’s death was systematically hidden from the public. Investigative files were kept secret. When Garcia’s family sued, a judge ordered that discovery be kept confidential. And when the family settled last year, the agreement required that no one discuss anything about the case. That all changed Oct. 1, when NJ Advance Media published a stunning expose about Garcia’s death in The Star-Ledger that revealed differing accounts of what happened, serious questions about the cause of death and how troopers treated Garcia, and conflicts of interest in the system that cleared them of wrongdoing. The five-month investigation and follow-up stories led to new legislation and major changes to trooper training.
  • Sun Sentinel: Speeding Cops

    A Miami cop in his marked patrol car set off a public fury in the fall of 2011 when a Florida state trooper clocked him going 120 mph to an off-duty job. Turning to technology and a never-before used tool – highway toll records – the Sun Sentinel produced back-to-back investigations documenting widespread police misconduct and the professional solidarity that allowed it to flourish. In "Above the Law," a three-part series published in February, reporters used police toll records to confirm what many South Florida drivers had witnessed for years: cops were among the worst speeders on the roads, taking advantage of the badge and patrol car to ignore the very laws they enforce. "Short Shifted," a two-part series published in December, used those same toll records to detail how many South Florida cops, paid to serve and protect, were regularly leaving their beats and cities before their shifts ended.
  • Moonlight Patrol

    After a grueling odyssey through the Pennslyvania courts, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review and the Associated Press obtained heavily redacted copies of 1,038 supplemental employment forms filed over the previous six and a half years by state troopers and the agency's civilian employees. Despite assurances to the contrary, the Trib uncovered numerous violations of statute and state regulations regarding the after-hours employment of the police.
  • Road to Nowhere:The men who are caught transporting illegal immigrants rarely pay the price

    A Colorado law passed to prohibit human smuggling has proven to be difficult to enforce. Most charges against human smugglers are dismissed or don't end up in court.
  • Crusier Crashes

    The Massachusetts State Troopers have caused nearly 500 cruiser crashes since 2000, most of which occurred while they were commuting or on regular patrol. However troopers are allowed to investigate themselves for accidents with less than $1000 in damages. "About 120 troopers have had four or more accidents over the past seven years."
  • Unsafe Trucks

    This investigation delved into the world of trucking in Alabama where there are too few state troopers, and even fewer inspectors. This story compared the number of truck inspections done in Alabama to other states and the consequences.
  • Badge of Privilege/Highway Patrol Coverage

    The authors investigated the Tennessee Highway Patrol and found an organization rife with cronyism, where political connections mattered more than skill at a traffic stop or enforcing the law, and a department that turned a blind eye to its own officers when they got in trouble.