Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "streets" ...

  • Trashed

    Fatal accidents; brutal work conditions; suspicious unions; lax oversight; mob ties and racketeers. Every night in New York, trucks from scores of private trash collection companies hit the city’s streets — often creating havoc and too rarely being reined in by regulators.
  • Protecting the Shield

    “Protecting the Shield” exposed the deaths and injuries caused by out-of-control rogue cops who are knowingly left on the streets by their superiors. This exhaustive indictment of government failings shows how weak police oversight cost citizens their lives, honest officers their careers and taxpayers tens of millions of dollars. Our work prompted police reforms, including random drug testing of all police officers and a statewide internal affairs overhaul.
  • Profiting from Hunger

    Venezuela’s president handed the military complete control of the food supply last year after people took to the streets to protest severe shortages. But far from fighting hunger in the crisis-wracked country, the AP investigation found evidence of the military making millions from it through kickbacks and the sale of staples on the black market at dozens of times the government-set prices.
  • Information Roadblock

    This story outlines the push-back we received from city leaders when we tried to obtain emails that might explain why and how a city council member tried to closed off a public street at the request of a Homeowners Association in an affluent neighborhood without notifying, or getting any input from the residents in the adjoining subdivision. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiZO3Ctg-0M&feature=youtu.be
  • Free to Flee

    In Florida, drunk drivers are routinely not arrested immediately after they cause a fatal crash, even when there’s sufficient probable cause to arrest them. In many cases, the drivers remain free as the investigations drag on for many months, well beyond accepted standards. Our investigation found that dozens of drunk drivers have escaped justice and hundreds more were left on the streets for years before being arrested and convicted, with some committing other crimes while they enjoyed their freedom.
  • Philly's Invisible Youth

    In a major multimedia investigation for Al Jazeera America, Laura Rena Murray writes about the alarming increase of homeless youth in Philadelphia and the utter failure of the child welfare agency and the emergency shelter system to care for them. By 2011, one in 20 of the city’s public high school students identified as having been homeless. Between 2009 and 2013, that percentage increased by 73 percent. There are many reasons youth end up on the streets. Most are trying to escape violent homes. http://projects.aljazeera.com/2015/12/homeless-youth/resources.html
  • The Laquan McDonald shooting and the city's broken system

    Under orders from a judge, Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s administration on Nov. 24, haltingly and reluctantly, released a police dash-cam video that showed a white police officer shooting a black teenager, Laquan McDonald. The video roiled Chicago. Protesters took to the streets. The police superintendent was fired. The officer who shot McDonald -- a ward of the state -- was charged with murder. And the U.S. Justice Department launched a civil rights investigation into the nation’s second largest police department. During the next three weeks, Tribune reporters set out to examine how the city and the Chicago Police Department had reached this point, and to put into context McDonald’s life and his fatal encounter with a department with a sordid history of brutality against minorities.
  • Juarez, A Fragile Peace

    This investigation was among the first ones to look back in time and write a poignant narrative on how the battle between the Juarez and Sinaloa drug cartels and the co-option of police forces as fighters for their criminal causes, turned the streets of this U.S.-Mexico border city into rivers of blood. It focused on how peace was obtained in 2012 with a combination of civic and government involvement, the arrival of a top tough-as-nails police chief who cleaned up the police, and intelligence provided by DEA informants that help jail top drug leaders, thus diffusing the fight.
  • Between Borders: American Migrant Crisis

    Each week, hundreds of young people—teenagers and children—attempt to flee the gang warfare that has gripped large swaths of Central America, heading north, crossing thousands of miles in hopes of obtaining asylum or settling with relatives in the United States. From October 2013 through July of this year, nearly 80,000 unaccompanied minors arrived at our southern border. In this powerful documentary for The New York Times, Pulitzer Center grantees Brent and Craig Renaud trace the journey from the violent streets of San Pedro Sula, Honduras through Guatemala and across the Suchiate River aboard flimsy rafts to Mexico. From there, some try to hop “the Beast”—a slow-moving freight train. Others hitchhike or simply make the long trek on foot. No matter the method they choose, the risk of arrest by authorities, abuse by human traffickers or abduction by drug cartels is a constant danger. As the debate on immigration takes center stage in the Republican presidential primary campaign, the Renaud brothers look at the causes and conditions that compel children to stake their lives on this dangerous journey. “Between Borders: American Migrant Crisis” shows us the reality of the so-called “illegals” who seek safe shelter in America. http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/americas/100000003901101/central-america-child-migrants.html http://pulitzercenter.org/education/meet-journalists-renaud-honduras
  • Child Castaways A CNN Freedom Project Documentary

    Nima Elbagir and her team spent almost nine months investigating the illegal Mediterranean crossing undertaken by Egyptian boys in search of a better life for their families. Some of these minors end up in the care of the Italian state, while others work for the very gangs who smuggled them, making money on the streets of Rome, selling whatever they can - including themselves. https://vimeo.com/151949090