Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "toxic chemicals" ...

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    Birmingham (Ala.) News discovers that many of the lakes in Alabama contain dangerous levels of toxic chemicals, including dioxin, and that the state's Department of Environmental Management knew of the pollution and had not made the information public, 1990.
  • SUBSTANTIAL DANGER

    WCBD-TV (Mt. Pleasant, S.C.) examines spraying of toxic chemicals (Surf-Kote) on Charleston submarines; finds several sailors who developed medical disorders; Navy ignores regulations, May 21 - 23, 1990.
  • Your right to know what you breathe and drink -- a new law emerges

    APF Reporter examines data from chemical companies on the release of toxic chemicals into the environment; comments on the public's right to know. Companies include Du Pont, Dow, Exxon, Union Carbide and Mosanto.
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    The Seattle Post-Intelligencer documents tanker trucks using the same marginally-cleaned tanks to carry edible liquids after hauling toxic chemicals; some food shippers knew, but said nothing to keep costs down, Sept. 21 - Dec. 28, 1989.
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    Corpus Christi Caller-Times finds there was virtually no federal funding for a new law requiring companies to disclose the amount of toxic chemicals they release into the air each year; also finds local fire departments and a local industry-sponsored company were ill-equipped to handle chemical disasters, July 1 - 3, 5 and Nov. 13 - 14, 20, 1988.
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    Houston Chronicle finds that despite the sweeping changes legislated by the Clean Air Act of 1970, millions of pounds of toxic substances still are poured into the air each year in Houston, creating a risk of catastrophic accidents and health problems, Feb. 16-20, 1986.
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    Washington Post discovers excessive dumping of toxic chemicals into Chesapeake Bay by private industries, military bases and municipal sewage treatment plants, despite the legislative protection of the 1972 Clean Water Act, June 1, 1987.
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    San Francisco Bay Guardian finds that despite the "Save The Bay" movement, San Francisco Bay is dying; problems include seafood contamination from toxic chemicals, pollution caused by development, and undrinkable water, Jan. 22-29, 1986.
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    Milwaukee Journal investigates the presence and lingering effects of toxic chemicals in the Great Lakes basin in a series covering past pollution, the clean-up, continued pollution, health effects and politics surrounding the toxic remains of industry and agriculture, Nov. 13-20, 1988.
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    Sacramento Bee publishes series on toxic chemicals leaking into underground water systems around the country from abandoned dump sites on U.S. military bases; reporters found the Defense Department program for dealing with the problem inadequate, Sept. 30 - Oct. 5, 1984.