Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "training" ...

  • MU's Asian students reluctant to report episodes of discrimination, racism

    The story is to reveal untold stories related to racial discrimination against MU's Asian students. While Na was speaking with more than 100 Asian students and several MU officials who were devising a diversity training that would be mandated for MU freshmen to take, he found several Asian students had undergone obvious racial mistreatment, but were not willing to report; and MU officials did not know of these racial instances suffered among MU Asian students.
  • Mental Health and Policing

    Our stories on mental health and policing sought to bring attention to the concern raised by advocates of the mentally ill—that police officers are often ill-equipped to handle calls for people in mental distress. It’s estimated as many as half of fatal police encounters involve people in mental health crisis. Over the course of several months, we told the stories of 3 young men, shot and killed by police in suburban Maryland counties. In each case, a mental health history was involved. We revealed the lack of uniform training and consistent use of crisis intervention teams. Without better effort to equip police, as first responders, a call to 911 can lead to a tragic result. http://www.wbaltv.com/article/mental-health-and-policing/8566410
  • Lack of Prosecution in Animal Abuse Cases

    We investigated why Kansas City and Jackson County rarely prosecuted cases of animal abuse. We learned animal control officers in Kanas City have no training or background in investigating these type of cases. Our investigation revealed only three cases of animal abuse were sumbitted for felony prosecution in the past two years. http://fox4kc.com/2015/03/31/woman-says-shes-lost-trust-in-kc-heartbroken-by-the-way-her-dead-dog-was-dumped/ http://fox4kc.com/2015/01/30/resident-demands-change-following-fox-4-investigation-into-kcmo-animal-abuse/ http://fox4kc.com/2015/01/29/fox-4-investigation-are-kc-animal-abusers-being-held-accountable-for-cruelty/
  • Tragedy on the Water

    A 20-year-old Iowa man died on May 31, 2014, while in the custody of a Missouri Highway Patrol trooper on the Lake of the Ozarks. Brandon Ellingson, stopped for suspicion of boating while intoxicated, was being transported to a patrol zone office when he fell – or, as the patrol initially said, jumped – from the trooper’s boat. His wrists were locked in handcuffs behind his back, and the life vest the trooper had placed over his head soon came off. Ellingson struggled to keep his head above water for several minutes before slipping to the bottom of the lake. Subsequent reporting revealed a series of mistakes by the trooper, a road veteran who had not received proper training to work the water after the Missouri Water Patrol was merged into the Highway Patrol in 2011.
  • Lives on the Line

    Reporter Doug Donovan uncovered inadequate care and state oversight of group homes that care for the most vulnerable of citizens: disabled foster children. His investigation revealed that state contractor Lifeline Inc. had numerous problems that were unknown to regulators. After his initial story the state moved the children to another group home. However, Donovan revealed issues with the new provider, including employees who were dismissed for mistreating patients and who lacked specialized training.
  • Killed in the Line of Training

    Neal Smith had excelled at his first day in an elite firefighter training exercise. But on Day 2, trapped in a small space and weighed down by 75 pounds of gear, he became disoriented in the fog and collapsed on the second floor of the building he was making his way through. A trainer screamed at him to get up, but he couldn't. His internal temperature was 108 degrees; his brain was swelling. When Mayday was called it was too late. Rushed to a nearby hospital, the experienced firefighter died there later that day. Most people assume that all firefighters are trained by their own fire departments. But departments in small town Texas actually have been sending their personnel to the East Texas Firemen's and Fire Marshal's Association, a nonprofit trade group for volunteer firefighters. And unlike a governmental agency, there is no oversight of that group's methods or standards. As a subsequent investigation by the state fire marshal's office and by the National Institute of Safety and Health revealed the training camp was so poorly run that several other firefighters had dropped out (saying they didn't want to risk their lives), passed out or been taken to the hospital. Had safety procedures standard in most fire departments been in place – such as a simple tub of ice – Smith could have been saved at the training camp site.
  • What killed Kenwin Garcia?

    To most in New Jersey, Kenwin Garcia, a 25-year-old from Newark, was invisible. He had no job, no kids, and spent most days in his room at his father’s house listening to reggae. So when he died in 2008 after being restrained by state troopers on the side of a busy highway, few gave the incident more than passing notice. During the next six years, the story of Garcia’s death was systematically hidden from the public. Investigative files were kept secret. When Garcia’s family sued, a judge ordered that discovery be kept confidential. And when the family settled last year, the agreement required that no one discuss anything about the case. That all changed Oct. 1, when NJ Advance Media published a stunning expose about Garcia’s death in The Star-Ledger that revealed differing accounts of what happened, serious questions about the cause of death and how troopers treated Garcia, and conflicts of interest in the system that cleared them of wrongdoing. The five-month investigation and follow-up stories led to new legislation and major changes to trooper training.
  • Children at Risk: Unregulated Day Care in Virginia

    The series revealed the deaths of 43 children at unregulated day-care homes in Virginia since 2004. About half the deaths were sleep-related and 10 involved physical abuse. In that same time frame, 17 children died in licensed day cares. Child care experts estimate that unregulated providers care for about one-third of all children in day care in Virginia. Unregulated providers are subject to no background checks, no training and no inspections. Because regulators don’t even know where the homes are located, the finding of the 43 deaths was news to government officials.
  • Nuclear Missteps

    After exposing low morale, training flaws and leadership lapses in the Air Force’s nuclear missile corps in a series of stories in 2013, Robert Burns used the Freedom of Information Act, tips from his network of military sources and interviews with Air Force officers at all levels to reveal in an exclusive series of stories in 2014 that the problems initially denied by the Air Force ran so deep and wide that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel declared “something is wrong” with the most high-risk arm of the U.S. military.
  • Till Death Do Us Part

    Awash in guns, saddled with ineffective laws and lacking enough shelters for victims of domestic abuse, South Carolina is among the nation's deadliest states for women, who are killed at a rate of one every 12 days. The series exposed numerous failings, including limited police training, inadequate laws, a lack of punishment, insufficient education for judges, a dearth of victim support, and traditional beliefs about the sanctity of marriage that keep victims locked in the cycle of abuse. These factors combine in a corrosive stew that, three times in the last decade, made South Carolina the No. 1 state in the rate of women killed by men.