Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "training" ...

  • Hired Guns

    Across the United States, there is a group of men and women who are given weapons and the imprimatur of law enforcement but who face almost no scrutiny: armed security guards. Until a CNN/The Center for Investigative Reporting investigation into the burgeoning industry, little was known about how haphazard and weak America’s standards were for training and regulating armed security guards. The result has left people dead and paralyzed, and families devastated.
  • The Coast Guard's deadly accidents

    Using never-before-reported data and compelling personal stories, G.W. Schulz with The Center for Investigative Reporting uncovered a disturbing trend in the Coast Guard. For years, the Guard has struggled with a string of deadly accidents because of poor training and lapses in judgment. More than two dozen aviators and other personnel have been killed in the air and at sea, including three who died after their helicopter crashed into power transmission wires that the Guard had been warned about but never fixed.
  • Wandering

    Six in 10 people with Alzheimer’s disease will wander, and a quick rescue is critical: 60 percent of those who wander, if not found within 24 hours, are going to die. But in Washington, government belt-tightening has hindered efforts to better equip local law enforcement to handle missing-persons cases involving dementia, InvestigateWest learned. A first-ever analysis of media reports, search-and-rescue mission reports, and interviews with law enforcement by InvestigateWest found that at least ten seniors have died as a direct result of wandering in the last five years. In that group is Samuel Counts, 71, a father of 10 and a retired Vietnam War veteran whose case fueled this story’s narrative. The Spokane County Sheriff’s Office waited six full days before enlisting a helicopter in the search, a delay that goes against search-and-rescue experts’ guidelines when someone is endangered. Even as the number of people with Alzheimer’s increases dramatically, no public record is routinely created in Washington when wandering is a contributing factor to death, and no state agency keeps a tally of these cases. Wandering behavior is predictable and training for law enforcement is available, but here in Washington, it takes a tragedy for anyone to pay attention.
  • Human Trafficking in Virginia

    We found a case of human trafficking that led to charges and changes after we exposed communication issues across local and national agencies and a lack of training and resources. In the first story, we talked to Roanoke County Police Officers who stopped a man driving a mini-van of 16 people, stacked on top of each other. Once stopped, police identified it as a human trafficking case but had to let them all get back in the van and drive away because U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement (ICE) wasn’t available to assist them and they say since the words “human trafficking” are not in Virginia law there were not any laws to arrest the man driving and help the victims. We continued to follow this story for the next six months talking to lawmakers, state and federal agencies who told us our story revealed breakdowns and weaknesses that have since been fixed.
  • Human Trafficking in Virginia

    We found a case of human trafficking that led to charges and changes after we exposed communication issues across local and national agencies and a lack of training and resources. In the first story, we talked to Roanoke County Police Officers who stopped a man driving a mini-van of 16 people, stacked on top of each other.
  • Toxic Legacy

    Employees of Technicoat, a metal coating company based in Fort Worth in the ‘70s and 80s, hired teenagers to dispose of industrial waste and harmful chemicals. None of the employees went through any kind of safety training or were given protective gear. Now many of the company’s former employees have either died from illnesses linked to chemical exposure or are currently battling illnesses that are likely related to being exposed to chemicals during their tenure at Technicoat. The story found that the city of Fort Worth and the Tarrant Regional Water District are still dealing with the environmental impact of the company’s illegal chemical dumping – sometimes down storm drains, in holes dug in the ground, or straight into the Trinity River – as the area that housed the Technicoat plant is being redeveloped. It also discovered that the company blatantly disregarded federal safety standards and was fined multiple times by different federal, state, and local agencies for environmental and safety violations.
  • Inside the Locker Room: Shooting Away the Pain

    An exclusive ABC News investigation in a partnership with ESPN discovered that tucked away in college training rooms, underneath the stadium, is a closely-held secret of team doctors using powerful prescription painkillers to get student athletes on the field, despite painful injuries, regardless of the price to their health. Painkiller shots given in college sports locker rooms, often called “The Magic Shot” by players, have long been rumored but kept hush-hush in the sporting world. The collaboration between the ABC News Brian Ross Investigative Team and ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” was a groundbreaking effort by major news organizations to document and expose the dangerous practice.
  • Goliad's $1 Million Mess

    A six-month Victoria Advocate investigation revealed a program started to promote economic development has instead been riddled with poor record-keeping, questionable loan practices, missing documents and virtually no accountability. The newspaper's investigation prompted the state's top law enforcement agency, the Texas Rangers, to investigate the town. That investigation is ongoing. The Advocate's investigation learned: • Since 2008, the development board has collected $525,624 in sales tax. It spent more than $1 million during those same five years, but the city does not accurately record the money. • Few on the board received economic development training. No one kept accurate records. No one accepts responsibility. • Three City Council members had loans while on the council. All three defaulted.
  • The abuse of Tasers in law enforcement

    A Necessary Shock? is a groundbreaking multi-media exposé of how 265 Iowa law enforcement agencies have quietly adopted the use of powerful electrical weapons commonly known as Tasers without establishment of required training or ethical standards to safeguard against abuse. The investigation told the stories of 11 different cases: One where a mentally disabled woman was tased four times in an effort to force her to change her clothing; two people who died in 2013 and eight who filed lawsuits alleging Iowa law enforcement officers used excessive force with the devices. Notable in this investigation is the collection and publication of videos in six of the cases. This evidence -- one showing an officer tasing a man who was already on his knees with his hands behind his head -- was made possible through relatively new lapel camera technology worn by some officers. Additionally, some Tasers themselves now have cameras, which were additionally collected through public record requests and published in this series.
  • Nuclear Missteps

    Beginning with his discovery of an internal Air Force admission of "rot" infesting its nuclear missile forces, AP National Security Writer Robert Burns probed to extraordinary depths within this highly secretive, rarely investigated organization for eight months to reveal a series of missteps by men and women with their finger on the trigger of the world's most deadly weapons. Using sources inside and outside the Air Force, in Washington and beyond, Burns documented deliberate safety and security violations, personal misbehavior, training failures, leadership lapses and chilling evidence of malaise among those entrusted with nuclear weapons. Burns peeled away the veneer of Air Force assurances that nothing was amiss, and brought to the attention of the American public a fuller picture of a nuclear missile force facing an uncertain future. His reporting prompted the Secretary of Defense, Chuck Hagel, to lament these "troubling lapses" and make a personal visit tot he force to insist they live up to their standards and demonstrate that they can be trusted with nuclear responsibilities.