Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "trustees" ...

  • WSAW: A Dying Wish

    After receiving a letter from a woman who was found dead, WSAW-TV's investigative reporter uncovered loopholes regarding the creation of churches, all while discovering small mistakes made by a county, a state agency and a federal agency allowing a church, some trustees call fake, to exist.
  • In Donors We Trust

    Everyone knows that college is more and more expensive to attend. So why are college and university endowments skyrocketing and now worth more than $567 billion? We started with the University of Michigan, lauded as one of the world’s best public universities which had stockpiled an endowment worth more than $11 billion. We found that university officials invested a good chunk of that endowment – one of the country’s largest among public institutions - in hundreds of private funds across the world. More importantly, our months-long investigation identified a select group who had secretly benefited: top university donors and alumni investment advisers who run private equity, hedge and venture capital funds and real estate investment firms. After our stories published throughout 2018, the university changed its investment policies; rerouted nearly $2 million into more student aid; made new investments based in the state; publicly released university executive compensation information after losing a FOIA lawsuit brought by the Free Press; and saw two university regents (i.e., trustees) lose their elections in November to those who promised more financial transparency and accountability based on our reporting.
  • Robin Hood in Reverse

    An investigation of Ohio’s eight largest public universities found that with one exception, trustees and administrators imposed hidden fees on thousands of working-class students to subsidize money-losing athletic departments while allowing academic spending to nosedive.
  • New Scrutiny of City's Library Trustees

    The city's libraries play an increasingly important role in the lives of immigrant, low-income and young New Yorkers. This story looks into the unique way New York's three library systems are run: with hundreds of millions of dollars in taxpayer money overseen by private boards of wealthy people with limited expertise and potential conflicts subject to little transparency or accountability.
  • The downfall of a jet-setting university president

    Evan Dobelle is a self-described visionary who compares himself to Apple founder Steve Jobs, and he charmed his way into the job of president at Westfield State University despite his checkered past. For years, Dobelle’s outsized personality dominated the western Massachusetts school -- until Globe reporters obtained copies of Dobelle’s outrageous business expense reports last July. Four months later, Dobelle resigned in disgrace on the heels of a series of investigative reports in the Globe that described hundreds of thousands of dollars in questionable business expenses, including exotic travel, luxury hotels, limo rides and an entire “business” trip to San Francisco that appears to have been a sham. Dobelle now faces an attorney general’s investigation for allegedly filing false claims to collect expenses. The Globe stories raised difficult questions about the quality of supervision in Massachusetts state universities, which rely on unpaid trustees to oversee hundreds of millions in public spending. Dobelle, it turned out, had been fired for wasteful spending and dishonesty at the University of Hawaii, but Westfield State trustees hired him anyway, then looked away when he resumed his free spending ways in Massachusetts.
  • Florida Atlantic University: Secret Pasts

    Special issue (five stories total) that resulted from an investigation into the Florida Atlantic University Board of Trustees.
  • United in Largesse

    United in Largesse is about extravagant spending and lack of accountability in the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers union, which has its headquarters in Kansas City, Kan. The Kansas City Star found that the union president’s salary and expenses far topped those of the presidents of the country’s largest unions and that the union had hired numerous officers’ relatives at robust salaries. The story also showed that union officials traveled by charter or first class to attractive destinations, squandered money on exclusive pheasant-hunting expeditions and Alaskan fly-fishing adventures and gave expensive cars as gifts to retiring officers. The Star also raised serious questions about conflicts of interest involving union pension fund trustees.
  • Mercury News: Loss of Trust

    The San Jose Mercury News IRE contest entry "Loss of Trust" consists of an original two-part series published July 1 and July 2, 2012, and the series' remarkable aftermath. The series exposed the eye-popping fees charged by private professionals working as court-appointed conservators and trustees for dependent adults in Silicon Valley - exorbitant rates that together with attorneys' fees threaten to force their vulnerable clients onto government assistance to survive. Within days of publication, the Santa Clara County Superior Court launched an overhaul of its local rules, and state legislation was pledged for the coming year to rein in the abuses.
  • The rise and fall of Ray Sansom, speaker of the Florida House

    Ray Sansom, the speaker of the Florida House, gave the state college “$35 million in two years”. These two years he oversaw the House budget, but wasn’t the speaker quite yet. Furthermore, these millions of dollars were added outside the normal budget method. Additionally, he worked with the college president to help maneuver the funds to the college.
  • Questionable Advisors, ethical gaps dog Detroit's public pensions

    The investigation “focused on the advisers to Detroit’s public pension plans and their investments.” The findings revealed: advisers failed to display the problems with the businessmen who pitched investments, trustees didn’t follow their rules and had zero travel policies, and the fund invested a large amount of money in real estate.