Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "undocumented immigrants" ...

  • Marshall Project: Is There a Connection Between Undocumented Immigrants and Crime?

    After The Marshall Project and the New York Times's The Upshot published an investigation a year ago debunking the often-repeated idea that immigrants increase crime in the U.S., our readers overwhelmingly had one question for us: What about undocumented immigrants? We knew we wanted to answer this question. The problem was, because it's difficult to collect data on them, very little information exists about undocumented immigrants. So when the Pew Research Center released new estimates of undocumented populations across the country, we saw the opportunity to respond to our readers.
  • American Coyotes

    American Coyotes is a series of stories about the human smugglers -- or "coyotes" -- who bring undocumented immigrants from Mexico into the United States via vehicle and on foot, often utilizing stash houses, in return for payments that vary depending on where the immigrant is coming from and where they are crossing the border. The stories look at how the coyotes operate, the impact they have on Americans who live along the border and the environment as well as the Border Patrol agents, law enforcement and even Texas National Guardsmen assigned to prevent undocumented immigrants.
  • Using Jailed Migrants as a Pool of Cheap Labor

    The U.S. government is the nation's single largest employer of undocumented immigrants. This was the startling discovery of a 7-month investigation into a little-known program that allows the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency to employ these immigrants and pay them a $1 a day or less to perform most of the jobs running the 250 federal immigration detention centers around the country. This finding was even more striking considering the number of undocumented workers involved -- more than 60,000 per year -- and the amount of money the federal government saves and private prison companies make (at least $40 million annually) as a direct result of being allowed to pay these people so far below the minimum wage, or about 13 cents per hour.
  • Canada's Unwanted

    A Global News investigation into the way Canada treats its non-citizens - refugee applicants, immigration detainees and just about anyone the government is trying to get rid of or whose status in the country remains up in the air - found systems rife with arbitrary opacity and questionable practices. They revealed never-before-published deaths in detention and pressured the Border Services Agency into releasing more information on the people who die in its custody. They also outlined the way Canada detains people indefinitely in jails on no charge – often with limited access to family, legal counsel and third-party monitoring agencies, denying repeated requests by the Red Cross to perform inspections of immigrant detention facilities in Canada's most populous province. In two years, Canada paid thousands of applicants to abandon their appeals and leave the country.
  • Speedy Removal

    Thousands of undocumented immigrants are being deported without a chance to appear before an immigration judge.
  • Escondido Police Under Fire

    Escondido, California, has a long history of discriminating against its large Latino population. For years the City Council had tried and failed to enact legislation that would make it difficult for Spanish-speaking immigrants, documented or otherwise, to take up residence there. But “Escondido Police Under Fire” uncovers how, in 2004, local legislators along with the Escondido Police Department found an ingenious way to rid the city of undocumented immigrants — and make a profit. In 2004, Congress gave the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration funds to encourage states to get drunk drivers off the road. Escondido some of these funds and began one of the most rigorous Driving Under the Influence checkpoint programs in the State of California. The taxpayer funds allowed Escondido police to set up sobriety checkpoints several times a month. The stated goal was to catch inebriated drivers and to raise public awareness about the dangers of drunk driving. But Escondido police quickly discovered that they could make money by impounding the vehicles of unlicensed drivers. At the time, in California, if someone was caught driving without a license, their vehicle could be seized and subjected to a 30-day impound. In Escondido, the fees to retrieve the impounded vehicle were exorbitant. Escondido police began systematically asking every driver who came through a sobriety checkpoint to show a driver’s license. Escondido Police, the investigation reveals, soon brokered an agreement with Immigration Customs Enforcement to run background checks on all unlicensed drivers at the sobriety checkpoints to ascertain whether they were legally in the country. If a perfectly sober undocumented immigrant drove up to a sobriety checkpoint and could not produce a driver’s license — even though the checkpoints were being funded to get drunk drivers off the road — the unlicensed driver’s car would be impounded, ICE would run a background check, and the driver would be deported. Quickly, these federally funded sobriety checkpoints had become de facto immigration checkpoints — at an enormous profit to the Escondido police. From 2008 to 2011 the city of Escondido and tow companies with city contracts pulled in $11 million in fees, citations and auctioned vehicles from checkpoints. And hundreds of drivers were subsequently deported.
  • In Iowa Meat Plant, Kosher 'Jungle' Breeds Fear; Injury, Short Pay

    Nathaniel Popper, reporting for the Forward (NY) investigated a Kosher slaughterhouse in Postville, Iowa, where he uncovered dangerous working conditions, low pay, and anti-unionization pressures that raised questions about the ethics of the Jewish owners of the plant towards their largely immigrant workers.
  • ¿Dónde está la frontera? Where is the border?

    Millions try each year to slip into the United States through its "soft underbelly" --the U.S. - Mexico border. It's no longer just Mexicans and Central Americans who attempt to cross from Mexico. The article talk about the INS attempts to globalize their polices.
  • INS Aims at Businesses, Hits Mexicans

    Gordon looked at Mexican workers deported by the INS. Over the past two years, the U.S. INS has stepped up its worksite raid effort, which targets the "job magnet" that attracts undocumented workers to the United States. That effort got an additional boost in 1996 with the passage of a federal law that enhanced the INS' ability to deport immigrants and further shielded companies from liability for hiring undocumented workers. The article shows that INS raids almost exclusively target Mexicans. Demographic information on workers arrested in 1996 and 1997 shows that 96.4 percent came from Mexico and 98.9 percent were Latinos. But Mexicans make up only 44 percent of Illinois' undocumented immigrants. State Senator Jesus Garcia, a Chicago Democrat, is consider teaming up with a group of civil rights lawyers to sue the INS.
  • Illegals and IBP

    "Illegals and IBP" was an in-depth investigative story on IBP, a local meatpacking plant in Waterloo employing 2,200 people, and their illegal hiring practices of undocumented immigrants. The article states IBP management knowingly hired illegal immigrants and encouraged some to buy false birth certificates. (August 25, 1996)