Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "united states" ...

  • CBS News: Healthcare Fraud in America

    For the past four years, CBS News has been committed to investigating healthcare fraud throughout the United States. Our reporting has uncovered schemes preying on veterans, cancer patients, rural communities, and opioid addicts. We’ve been the only network to expose con artists defrauding billions from private insurance companies, Medicare and even Tricare, a component of the military health system. In 2016 we produced an investigative series that found compounding pharmacies were collecting prescriptions for pain creams and billing insurance more than $1 million per week. Last year, our reporting revealed an insurance scheme involving genetic testing that cost the Pentagon trillions. This year’s entries continue our work to expose unscrupulous actors bilking insurance to cash in on the American healthcare system. Our stories go beyond examining the fiscal toll of insurance fraud, they illustrate the human impact these practices have on communities, families, and individuals.
  • CBC News - Missing and Murdered: Finding Cleo

    This submission is for a podcast with ten episodes. The submission includes the episodes, an audio trailer as well as a link to the podcast website where you can find other material such as photos and video and text stories and uploaded files of the episode transcripts (as supplementary material) On the surface, this is a true crime story trying to answer the question - what happened to Cleo Semaganis Nicotine? She and her siblings in the Cree Indigenous family were taken into government care in Saskatchewan, Canada in the 1970's and adopted into white families in Canada and the United States. The siblings re-connected as adults but can't find Cleo. They've heard that she ran away from a home in Arkansas and was murdered but they don't know if that is true. They want help to at least find where she is buried.
  • Deadly Deliveries

    There is more to the story to the abysmal rate of maternal deaths and injuries in the United States than societal ills or women's lifestyles: Hospitals know how to protect mothers. They just aren't doing it. Across the nation, women giving birth needlessly die and suffer life-altering injuries due to substandard medical care.
  • US Tax Havens: The new Switzerland

    Financial Times' Investigations Correspondent Kara Scannell was the first to uncover first hand accounts of how businesses exploit complex trust laws in South Dakota. Her findings, published as "US Tax Havens: The new Switzerland" uncovered a thriving onshore tax haven business. Scannell's shoe-leather reporting gave her unprecedented access to first person sources, including exclusive access to elusive business figures within the shadowy practice. Together with Vanessa Houlder, Scannell's trust law research emboldened a lively, revelatory report that contributed to the ongoing and serious debate over the use and abuse of domestic tax havens.
  • Shoot to Kill

    With no dependable, uniform data on gun violence, it’s impossible to get even a simple tally of the number of shootings in the United States. So Baltimore Sun reporter George and Marquette University students, as part of the O’Brien Fellowship in Public Service Journalism, spent months trying to understand how many people are shot and how often they survive. What they found is that the odds of survival for gunshot victims were getting worse in at least 10 of the nation’s largest cities, including Baltimore, New York and Chicago.
  • Toxic Armories

    Every time a soldier pulled the trigger inside a National Guard gun range, a bullet cast off bits of lead. An 18-month investigation by The Oregonian/OregonLive found that the Guard's neglect allowed the toxic dust to spread, endangering soldiers and visitors to armories across the United States.
  • Watched

    Police forces across the United States are stockpiling massive databases with personal information from millions of Americans who simply crossed paths with officers. A person can end up in one of these databases by doing nothing more than sitting on a public park bench or chatting with an officer on the street. Once there, these records can linger forever and be used by police agencies to track movements, habits, acquaintances and associations – even a person’s marital and job status. What began as a method for linking suspicious behavior to crime had morphed into a practice that threatens to turn local police departments into miniature versions of the NSA. In the process, critics contend, police risk trampling constitutional rights, tarnishing innocent people and further eroding public trust.
  • Unsettling

    The federal government oversees a complex program to help refugees come to this country. But the effort does not always live up to promises, potentially making the path more difficult for refugees striving to adapt to their new homeland. Audits, financial filings and internal government reports indicate that a significant number of government-funded charities contracted to help the newcomers are misspending money, an NYCity News Service examination of hundreds of documents found. Promised services are delayed or never delivered, medical care is often postponed beyond guidelines and program oversight can lag. http://unsettling.nycitynewsservice.com/
  • Rhino Horn Trafficking

    Poaching rhino for horn has decimated the species, corrupted law enforcement from rangers to prosecutors, judges, and politicians, and resulted in the killing of rangers and poachers throughout the rhinos’ range. Unlike elephants whose ivory tusks do not grow back, rhino horn can be sawed off and it will regrow, opening an opportunity to farm the species. This story investigates the highly controversial effort by the South African game industry to farm rhino as a proposed solution to the international trafficking problem. In particular, two South Africans who hold the key to the rhino’s future, have used lawsuits and, in one case, a shell plaintiff to block major criminal actions in South Africa and the United States, as well as to force the lifting of South Africa’s ban on rhino horn trade.
  • Almighty

    A riveting, chilling tale of how a group of ragtag activists infiltrated one of the most secure nuclear-weapons sites in the United States, told alongside a broader history of America's nuclear stewardship, from the early stages of the Manhattan Project to our country's never-ending investment in nuclear weaponry.