Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "violence" ...

  • Doubled Up In Solitary Confinement

    This seems like a contradiction. Put a prison inmate into a solitary confinement cell and then give him a cellmate. It’s called “double-cell solitary confinement”: Two inmates considered so dangerous and violent that they’re removed from the general prison population but then put together in one tiny cell, together for 23 to 24 hours a day. NPR’s Investigations Unit exposed this little-known practice that is common in federal and state prisons. The series showed how double-cell solitary confinement results in high levels of prison violence and sharply increases the likelihood of inmates killing other inmates.
  • Investigations following Philando Castile shooting

    On the night of July 6, 2016, 32-year-old Philando Castile was shot dead by St. Anthony police officer Jeronimo Yanez during a traffic stop. Castile’s girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, live-streamed the aftermath on Facebook. Video of a dying, blood-soaked Castile, who is black, with Yanez’s gun trained on him was viewed by millions, and sparked outrage across the country. These five stories investigate the officer, his training, and the multitude of traffic stops Castile encountered before his death, despite not having a criminal record
  • Dying for Change: Domestic Violence Victims & Law Enforcement Failures

    In more than a dozen reports followed by a 30 minute in depth special report, the Denver7 investigative team exposed a series of critical law enforcement breakdowns in the handling of fatal and near fatal domestic violence calls. At a time when this critical issue is under the national microscope the breakdowns exposed in this reporting brought changes in several law enforcement agencies and have sparked lawmakers to review current reporting and oversight requirements in Colorado and to consider new legislation in the coming session. https://vimeo.com/user22591361/review/198500061/f0f5da3ab0
  • Voiceless

    "Voiceless" exposes a flawed system in which access to interpretation and translation services can spell the difference between life and death for Spanish-speaking victims of domestic violence in New York City.
  • Domestic Violence Dismissals

    “Domestic Violence Dismissals” analyzed the complex institution behind domestic violence court cases, specifically focusing on the high rate of case dismissals. On average, only 20 percent of cases of domestic violence in Athens County, Ohio, are prosecuted. The majority of the remaining 80 percent are dismissed, with a smaller percentage – but still substantial amount – of cases reduced to a lesser charge. Cases are dismissed for a multitude of reasons, often including a lack of response from the victim or a victims’ unwillingness to prosecute. The story further delved into the nuance of dismissing a domestic violence case.
  • What Does Gun Violence Really Cost?

    For our May/June 2015 cover story, we sought to answer a simple question: Why doesn’t anyone know what gun violence costs? Led by national affairs editor Mark Follman, MoJo reporters worked with an economist to crunch complicated datasets to find the answer: $229 billion—about the same as the obesity epidemic. They laid out the data in compelling charts and videos, reported on the forces that suppress research, and profiled survivors bankrupted and forced to navigate their lives in wheelchairs. The package was the first to exhaustively outline the economic, social, and human costs of gun violence and it made waves on Capitol Hill. Sen. Chris Murphy said “This new report from Mother Jones will make silence just a little harder from now on.” Just weeks later President Obama addressed the issue for the first time in a speech to the nation’s mayors, saying gun violence “costs you money…It costs this country dearly.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcxeVBPH-1w https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvW5gD8YYUA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nook1b8EyTs
  • Fan Safety at Arrowhead

    In the wake of 9/11 and more recent terrorist attacks, the NFL has made fan safety at football stadiums a top priority. But we uncovered another kind of terror that's not getting much attention: fights caused by drunk, unruly fans. Our investigation revealed there are more reports of fights and assaults at Arrowhead than at stadiums in similar sized markets. In 2013, one of those Arrowhead fights claimed the life of a young man and father of a seven-week-old baby. His family and others assaulted at Arrowhead say there isn't enough security at the stadium to protect fans. http://fox4kc.com/2015/11/23/critics-say-violence-isnt-limited-to-collisions-on-the-gridiron-at-arrowhead-stadium/
  • Juarez, A Fragile Peace

    This investigation was among the first ones to look back in time and write a poignant narrative on how the battle between the Juarez and Sinaloa drug cartels and the co-option of police forces as fighters for their criminal causes, turned the streets of this U.S.-Mexico border city into rivers of blood. It focused on how peace was obtained in 2012 with a combination of civic and government involvement, the arrival of a top tough-as-nails police chief who cleaned up the police, and intelligence provided by DEA informants that help jail top drug leaders, thus diffusing the fight.
  • Use of Force: How the courts respond to police violence doesn’t always lead to justice

    This story examines how law enforcement officers justify using deadly force through the lens of three questionable Houston-area police shootings and one Texas law enforcement official who routinely defends officers in court as an expert witness.
  • The Louisiana State Penitentiary Where inmates aren't the only scoundrels

    Burl Cain was America’s most famous jailer. Writers and filmmakers flocked to the remote Louisiana State Penitentiary in West Feliciana Parish to tell the story of how he had cleaned up the most violent jail in America. But there was more to the story. For two decades, Cain profited from his access to powerless inmates and his ability to dispense favors small and large. The Advocate launched an investigation, and after the first story was published, Cain quit his job, hoping that would stop the questions. He was wrong.