Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "violence" ...

  • Jailhouse Jeopardy

    In 2009, the Department of Justice unearthed piles of evidence of abuse, deaths and corruption at the Harris County jail – and then they’d gone away. But instead of improvements local officials had promised, the Houston Chronicle’s own wide-ranging probe – called Jailhouse Jeopardy – revealed the county jail – one of the nation’s largest – remained an extremely dangerous and violent place. The series documented dozens of preventable deaths, rampant abuse of prisoners by guards – including two guard-related homicides, unjust prosecutions launched by guards who’d abused inmates and tough judges who routinely locked up elderly and even dying defendants in one of Texas’ most extreme pretrial detention policies. The series featured compelling video testimonials of violent and tragic episodes, including a widow who watched her husband die in a jailhouse restraint video, parents who lost their son after he contracted the flu in jail, a man locked up for three years after being accused of a crime by a guard who'd broken his finger and many other untold stories.
  • Out of Control: Inmate violence at state-run Martin Girls Academy has local staff, taxpayers paying

    Treasure Coast Newspapers’ reporter Melissa E. Holsman began investigating Martin Girls Academy after hearing from prosecutors, defense attorneys and others concerned with the sometimes brutal violence being reported at the facility since it opened in 2008. Records detail multiple assaults victimizing youth and, more often, employees. The monthslong research included reviewing hundreds of arrest and assault documents, juvenile justice reports, Department of Children and Families abuse records, videos capturing assaults at the complex and personal interviews with current and former staff, attorneys and state officials. Melissa found such a high level of violence within the facility that it is a safety hazard to employees and to the girls themselves. The violence also is costing Martin County taxpayers thousands of dollars annually.
  • Fatal Shootings by Police

    The FBI keeps flawed data on people killed by police. So The Post logged every fatal shooting in 2015 -- and embarrassed the FBI into action
  • Violent Madison gang offenses show nearly 200 percent increase over last decade

    At the base of Madison’s erupting violence, police records show a dramatic increase over the last decade in known gang members charged with committing crimes. https://vimeo.com/matthewsimonjournalist/review/133320664/7874f195ad
  • Focus on Force

    An Orlando Sentinel investigation found that the Orlando Police Department used force against suspects far more often than other departments of similar size; that a small number of officers accounted for an outsize proportion of the use of force; that the department’s internal-affairs division never investigated officer violence that resulted in the city’s paying more than $1 million to settle excessive-force claims; and that the city’s downtown core accounted for one in every three instances of force used by officers against suspects.
  • Shots on the Bridge: Police Violence and Cover-Up in the Wake of Katrina

    Six days after Hurricane Katrina’s landfall in New Orleans, New Orleans Police Department officers opened fire on residents crossing the Danziger Bridge. When the shooting stopped, a mentally challenged man and a seventeen-year-old boy were dead, riddled with gunshot wounds. A mother’s arm was shot off, her daughter’s stomach gouged with a bullet hole, and her husband’s head pierced by shrapnel. Her nephew was shot in the neck, jaw, stomach, and hand. All six of the victims, along with two others arrested at the scene, were black and unarmed. Before the blood dried, the shooters and their supervisors had hatched a cover-up. They would plant a gun, invent witnesses, and charge two of their victims with attempted murder. The NOPD hailed all the shooters on the bridge as heroes. Shots on the Bridge explores one of the most dramatic cases of injustice in the last decade. It reveals the fear that gripped the police of a city fallen into anarchy, the circumstances that led desperate survivors to go to the bridge, and the horror that erupted with the gunfire. It dissects the cover-up that nearly buried the truth and the legal maze that, a decade later, leaves the victims still searching for justice.
  • Police Wife: The Secret Epidemic of Domestic Violence

    "Police Wife" shows that spousal abuse is much more prevalent in police homes than in the wider population and that most police departments do little to stop it. The book also shows that the problem has impacts well beyond police families and is connected to a wide range of other issues, including botched responses to 911 domestic calls at other homes, police sexual harassment of women cops and female drivers at traffic stops, police killings of African Americans and growing social inequality. This is by all evidence the first book worldwide in journalistic form on this issue.
  • The Changing Face of America

    Most data-driven discussions about race focus either on the national level (which masks local trends) or are centered on areas of conflict (such as Ferguson, Mo.) USA TODAY wanted to give people the tools that would allow them to explore how race end ethnicity have changed over time -- where they live and where they go to school. But how do you measure diversity when such trends wax and wane over time? Is a community that changed from nearly all-white to all-black as diverse as an area that received a high level of immigrants? Why do some communities barely notice big changes over time, while others become a nexus of violence? And how does the change in my community compare to anyone else's? To do that USA TODAY needed a tool to level the playing field, a way to show 100 years of change both locally and nationally, on the same scale. The series, based on the USA TODAY Diversity Index, is explanatory data at its best: quantifying incremental change that everyone sees anecdotally.
  • Waste and Violence at Colorado Human Services

    Waste and Violence at Colorado Human Services is a broad investigation into the policies and practices that have led state officials to squander millions, increase benefits to people not qualified for the money and allow repeated attacks on staff and others at their facilities. Despite stalling and refusal to release some records, Watchdog.org went over road blocks, obtaining records from other agencies and sources, to tell the story. During four months, Watchdog.org found the state repeatedly violated federal law, changed policies to increase welfare benefits and made changes that endangered staff at its juvenile detention facilities.
  • 70,000 Kids Will Show Up Alone at Our Border This Year. What Happens to Them?

    Mother Jones published a months-long investigation into this surge of "tens of thousands of unaccompanied children, some as young as five, crossing the border" each year. Ian Gordon reports that these minors face a perilous journey to escape extremely violent and impoverished conditions in their home country. In 2013, the number of unaccompanied minors apprehended crossing the border more than doubled to 38,833 and this year, officials estimate the number will double again to more than 70,000.