Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "violence" ...

  • European Jihadists

    As the world's attention turned to ISIS advancing from their staging ground in Syria through to Iraq, CNN International correspondent Atika Shubert and her team focused on the phenomenon of European jihadists joining their ranks. They are primarily young Muslims, who are drawn to fight in Syria -- often leaving solid middle-class homes and relatively comfortable lives to participate in “jihad” – holy war, alongside members of ISIS, al Qaeda and other groups. It is a phenomenon that keeps western intelligence agents up at night, and as this description is being written, Atika is in Paris reporting for CNN while French authorities are on a massive man-hunt for terrorists who may have done just that – gone to fight in Syria and come back to bring their extreme beliefs and its attendant violence back home. Through their reporting, Atika and her team have tried to understand the phenomenon – even interviewing British jihadists in Idlib, Syria via Skype to find out why they are there.
  • Throwaway Kids

    Teenagers at a mental health facility tied face-down to a bed and injected with powerful sedatives as punishment for small infractions. And yet, as my investigation showed, this was common at the state-funded Citrus Health facility in Pembroke Pines, Florida, a 56-bed facility for teens dealing with mental disease, sexual abuse, and addiction. The systemic abuse didn't stop there. Public records and interviews outlined a pattern of violence and sloppy policy.
  • Down and Out at Inglewood Unified

    Inglewood Unified serves a low income, high minority community which sits in the shadow of Los Angeles. By just being born in this city kids are already at a disadvantage: high crime, high poverty, high teen pregnancy. So when the District received tens of millions of dollars in state aid as part of takeover, the hope was to clean up the schools. KPCC wanted to find out if that happened. We investigated Inglewood Unified schools and found conditions at an all time low: campuses dealing with rats, fire safety problems, exposed wiring and an increase in violence. We also found campus security was eliminated while the new superintendent of the district received a $150,000 a year personal security detail. There were results from their investigation, including a massive clean up and repair of schools, rehiring of campus security personnel and an end to the superintendent's security detail.
  • A Huge Hurt for Taxpayers

    The length and cost of job-related injury leaves taken by city of Los Angeles employees are growing rapidly, the Los Angeles Times found, primarily because the employees take home more money when they’re out with claimed injuries than they do when they show up for work. Payments to injured police and firefighters, who get 100% of their salaries, tax-free, while out on leave, rose 30% from 2009 to 2013, The Times found. Fewer than 5% of the injuries were attributed to acts of violence, smoke inhalation or contact with fire, city data show. About 50% were blamed on “cumulative trauma,” ailments that afflict aging bodies regardless of profession: back strain, knee strain, high blood pressure, carpal tunnel syndrome. Cumulative trauma was also the leading cause of injury among the city’s civilian workers, who typically get 90% of their salaries, tax-free, while on leave.
  • Who’s to blame for El Salvador’s gang violence?

    While countless news outlets rushed to cover protests against the flood of Central American migrants crossing into the United States this past summer, NewsHour Weekend took a different approach. They launched an investigation into why an estimated 230,000 Central Americans felt the need to flee countries like El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. Their investigation, which focused on El Salvador, revealed that the current mass exodus of Salvadorans has actually been thirty years in the making. It was fueled by a combination of American foreign policy decisions in the 1980’s and an act of congress in the mid 1990’s. The story ultimately raises questions about United States culpability in the current predicament.
  • Los Nuevos Narcotesoros

    Univision News’ Investigative Unit, presents an in-depth report on the devastating consequences of illegal mining by organized crime in Latin America, taking viewers inside a criminal world where mafias that formerly only trafficked drugs are now exploiting the mineral resources of Mexico, Colombia and Peru to finance their operations and expand their power. Taking its cameras from the Mexican states of Michoacán and Guerrero to different regions of Colombia and the Peruvian Amazon, “Nuevos Narcotesoros” delivers a compelling account of how violent criminal organizations are taking over the extraction of gold and iron ore and victimizing entire communities by extorting, torturing and killing miners who do not conform to their demands, as well as gaining control of local governments through violence and bribery.
  • Product of Mexico

    Americans have grown accustomed to year-round supplies of fresh, affordable fruit and vegetables. “Product of Mexico,” a four-part Los Angeles Times series, made vividly clear the human costs of this abundance. The 18-month investigation found that many farm laborers at Mexican export farms are essentially trapped for months at a time in rat-infested camps, often without beds and sometimes without functioning toilets or a reliable water supply. Those who seek to escape have to contend with guards, barbed-wire fences and threats of violence. Major U.S. companies have done little to enforce social responsibility guidelines that call for basic worker protections such as clean housing and fair pay practices.
  • Gun Wars: A News21 Investigation of Rights and Regulations in America

    An examination of the contentious political and cultural divide between those who say the right to own and carry guns is guaranteed by the Second Amendment and those who believe firearms should be more regulated. The project used or created nine databases to assess gun laws in every state in the nation and to document violence involving firearms across the United States. We also conducted hundreds of interviews across the country with longtime politicians, shooting victims, militia members, rural sheriffs, hunting enthusiasts, inner-city mothers and advocacy groups on all sides of the debate, to name a few.
  • Mexico Violence

    The June 30 press release from the Mexican Defense Secretary stated that military personnel had discovered a warehouse filled with armed men who opened fire on the troops. Soldiers repelled the attack, 22 “presumed aggressors” died – and just one soldier was wounded. The experienced Mexico staff of The Associated Press doubted the official story: 22 dead on one side, zero on the other seemed unlikely in a firefight. Correspondent Mark Stevenson set out for the warehouse in a remote area of the state of Mexico known to be rife with drug traffickers, and discovered evidence of a massacre. This series details what the AP investigation uncovered.
  • Rikers Island

    The series of stories produced by AP over the course of 2014, based largely on documents obtained via public records requests and information gleaned from city sources, provides a rare and detailed examination inside the nation's largest city's deeply troubled and neglected jail system – where violence reigns and sick and mentally ill inmates suffer the most.