Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "voting rights" ...

  • Inside Texas' botched voter-rolls review

    The press release landed late on a Friday afternoon: State officials had found 95,000 “noncitizens” on the Texas voter rolls — and 58,000 of those people had voted. The reaction from GOP state leaders, who have long pushed unsubstantiated claims of rampant voter fraud in Texas, was swift and certain. “VOTER FRAUD ALERT,” Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton tweeted. “Thanks to Attorney General Paxton and the Secretary of State for uncovering and investigating this illegal vote registration,” Gov. Greg Abbott tweeted, adding, “I support prosecution where appropriate.” Even President Donald Trump chimed in. “58,000 non-citizens voted in Texas, with 95,000 non-citizens registered to vote. These numbers are just the tip of the iceberg.” The state’s claims immediately raised red flags for our voting rights reporter, Alexa Ura. Ura knew the state had used driver’s license records — where applicants must reveal their citizenship status — to cross-reference the voter rolls and flag potential illegitimate voters. She also knew that in Texas, immigrants only have to renew their driver’s license every few years — meaning many thousands of people flagged by the state’s review had almost certainly become naturalized citizens before they registered and voted. Her breaking news story on state leaders’ “voter fraud” announcement explained those flawed methods and cast serious doubts on their claims. But her follow-up reporting — dozens of explanatory and investigative stories over as many weeks — had far greater impact than merely debunking irresponsible claims.
  • Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism: Undemocratic

    An investigative reporting class at the University of Wisconsin-Madison investigated the state of Wisconsin's democracy. It found that partisan gerrymandering, voter restrictions, secret campaign money, furtive legislative moves and fast-tracking of bills increasingly leave Wisconsin's citizens in the dark when it comes to state policy making and spending.
  • Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote

    “Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote” is a television news special that raised awareness about the large amount of the state’s population that is ineligible to vote due to a prior felony conviction. The news special outlined the subjectivity in current way in which Florida restores felon’s voting rights, highlighted a proposed state amendment that would automatically restore voting rights to most Florida felons, and featured prospective voters discussing the issue after watching the special as a group.
  • Locked Out: Florida sentences are for life

    A group of University of Florida journalists investigated barriers felons face when released from prison in the Sunshine State. For four months, they followed the lives of seven felons, some just minutes after they were released. In a digital-first, Netflix-style episodic investigation, these student journalists explored how the label “felon” follows 1.6 million Floridians long after their sentences end. The student journalists looked into the three major issues Florida felons face: finding a place to live, securing a stable job and earning back their right to vote.
  • APM Reports: Voter Suppression

    A handful of states are using someone's decision not to vote as the trigger for removing them from the rolls. The APM Reports analysis resulted in the first estimate of the so-called "use it or lose it" policy's possible impact. We found that no state has been more aggressive with this approach than Georgia, where Brian Kemp, as secretary of state, oversaw the purging of a growing number of voters ahead of his own run for governor, according to an APM Reports investigation. Voting rights advocates call it a new form of voter suppression, and they fear it will soon spread to other states.
  • Election Integrity: The Southern Vote Project

    In our groundbreaking, exclusive, “flood-the-zone” Southern Vote Project, WhoWhatWhy probed the state of election integrity and revealed deep problems, including widespread disenfranchisement of large segments of the voting public. Sending a full-time team to several southern states, we documented a broad range of factors, some seemingly intentional, that resulted in voter suppression or created cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Because we were uniquely focused on this topic, we started breaking stories that other outlets were unwilling or unable to pursue. Our work played an important role in compelling legacy news outlets to begin covering this issue. Our hard-hitting coverage also resulted in several lawsuits, which in turn brought about changes in how votes were counted through court decisions made in the heat of the elections.
  • Voting Wars: Rights | Power | Privilege

    “Voting Wars,” an investigation of voting rights and election participation, is the 2016 project of the Carnegie-Knight News21 program, a national multimedia, investigative reporting project produced by the nation’s top journalism students and graduates.
  • Jim Crow Returns

    The Interstate Crosscheck program may threaten the voting rights of millions, disproportionately minority, in 27 states for the 2014 midterms and beyond.
  • Overcoming Injustice: Safeguarding the right to vote

    The two-day series looked at black participation at the polls 40 years after the Voting Rights Act safeguarded their right to vote. In a county-by-county analysis of black voter turnout in the 2004 election, it found that blacks still participate at a much lower level than the voting population in general. Officials and advocates were divided on whether this difference in black participation reflects a squandering of the legacy their parents and grandparents died to create, or whether obstacles to voting remain for black voters.
  • Making elections fair to minorities: Teaneck case shows complex issue

    This investigation rooted in an analysis of census block data and voting records revealed the level of racially polarized voting in the community of Teaneck and raised questions of whether minorities received fair representation in politics and government. A Justice Department investigation into whether the town should replace its at-large elections with a ward system to ensure better minority representation prompted the newspaper to pursue its own investigation.