Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "witnesses" ...

  • Silent No More

    The Hearst Television National Investigative Unit’s year-long investigation, ‘Silent No More,’ uncovered new allegations of child sexual abuse and decades-long cover-ups inside a religious organization in the United States. We also learned investigators from Attorneys General offices in at least three states have been looking into the Jehovah’s Witnesses church – and that the number has likely grown since our four-part series aired in August and September of 2019. Perhaps most importantly, the survivors who agreed to speak on-camera for this series told us they now have a new sense of empowerment; one launched a non-profit, a few testified before state legislatures, several obtained attorneys, and all told us of the confidence they gained after being silent for so long.
  • The Daily News: Detective Do-Little

    The Daily News’ investigation into Detective Thomas Rice exposed that he was fabricating fake witness names and addresses and repeatedly using them to close grand larceny cases on a significant scale in the Ozone Park section of Queens. Instead of being fired, Rice was transferred to another precinct, docked just 20 vacation days, and allowed to keep his detective rank and salary including overtime, while running his snow blowing and power washing company on the side with NYPD approval.
  • SCNG: Bad Apples

    SCNG's special report on teacher misconduct at a local school district found that district administrators ignored signs and complains of inappropriate behavior by teachers and in some cases outright abuse of students for years. Reporters Joe Nelson and Scott Schwebke spent months interviewing dozens of sources, scouring thousands of pages of documents and reviewing more than 100 hours of recorded interviews and depositions with victims, witnesses and parents. Their reporting has led to a state investigation into the district's handling of misconduct complaints and sweeping reforms within the district itself.
  • ProPublica: The Child Abuse Contrarians

    Judges and juries hearing cases of alleged physical abuse of babies rely on expert witnesses to illuminate the medical evidence based on an impartial examination of the record and the victims. But in two fascinating investigative profiles co-published by ProPublica and The New Yorker, ProPublica Senior Reporter David Armstrong exposed a pair of sought-after expert witnesses who fall far short of this standard. Both work exclusively for accused child abusers and use dubious scientific arguments to make their case, potentially undermining justice and endangering children. Their success underscores the susceptibility of the U.S. judicial system to junk science, as well as the growing suspicion of mainstream medicine in an era when misinformation quickly spreads online.
  • FRONTLINE: UN Sex Abuse Scandal

    An investigation into sex abuse by United Nations peacekeepers in the world’s conflict zones. Award-winning correspondent Ramita Navai traces allegations from Congo to the Central African Republic, with firsthand accounts from survivors, witnesses and officials.
  • Rape Victim Jailed: Jenny's Story

    A mentally ill rape victim who had a breakdown on the witness stand while testifying against her attacker was thrown in jail by the Harris County District Attorney's Office for nearly a month. Prosecutors worried she would not return weeks later to complete her testimony. The prosecutor’s conduct and the abuse the rape victim was subjected to in jail was exposed by the reporters. The reporters exposed a series of mistakes by jail staff that further victimized the woman. The outrage and fallout from their reporting quickly became the central campaign issue in the race for Harris County District Attorney between incumbent Devon Anderson and challenger Kim Ogg. On election night, Ogg defeated Anderson by a 7 point margin and cited the “Jenny” story as the defining issue of the campaign in her acceptance speech. Ogg fired the prosecutor who handled the case and started a new sex crimes unit to protect victims and witnesses. State senators on both sides of the aisle filed new legislation for the 2017 session to mandate legal representation for witnesses held on bonds for their testimony, a statewide solution to the problem the reporters exposed.
  • The LaQuan McDonald Investigation

    An investigation into a police shooting of a 17-year old. Our investigation uncovered the following: allegations that police failed to properly interview witnesses; a claim that Chicago police on the scene that night erased 86-minutes of video from surveillance cameras at a nearby Burger King; that none of the police cars on the scene recorded audio and only two of the original five squad cars recorded video; that failure to record audio was in violation of a special police order; that none of the cars on the scene reported any dash cam malfunctions; that police reports were in direct contradiction to what was seen on the video; that city emails showed top aides to the Mayor were corresponding about the video months before the Mayor claimed he was told in detail what happened. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vH9t8LPofrM&feature=youtu.be
  • The Darren Sharper serial rape case

    This set of stories explains how former NFL star Darren Sharper was able to drug and rape women in multiple states over a few years without being stopped sooner. The stories were made possible by the collection of numerous public records as well as numerous interviews with sources at every level of the case, from witnesses to law enforcement officials, both for the record and not for attribution.
  • Freddie Gray Investigation

    WBAL-TV’s lead investigative reporter, Jayne Miller, led the way locally, and nationally, on the investigation into what happened to Freddie Gray, the 25 year old Baltimore man critically injured while in police custody, and who died a week later. Gray was injured on April 12, 2015. Miller immediately started questioning why Gray was arrested, and what happened inside the police van. Over the next three weeks she filed more than a dozen reports, utilizing multiple sources and witnesses. She revealed a troubling timeline that detailed the moment Gray was arrested, the stops police made, and how long it took them to finally get Gray the medical attention he so desperately needed. Her reports raise important questions about probable cause, police policy, and accountability. http://www.wbaltv.com/tv/about/ire-freddie-gray-investigation/37381262
  • Shots on the Bridge: Police Violence and Cover-Up in the Wake of Katrina

    Six days after Hurricane Katrina’s landfall in New Orleans, New Orleans Police Department officers opened fire on residents crossing the Danziger Bridge. When the shooting stopped, a mentally challenged man and a seventeen-year-old boy were dead, riddled with gunshot wounds. A mother’s arm was shot off, her daughter’s stomach gouged with a bullet hole, and her husband’s head pierced by shrapnel. Her nephew was shot in the neck, jaw, stomach, and hand. All six of the victims, along with two others arrested at the scene, were black and unarmed. Before the blood dried, the shooters and their supervisors had hatched a cover-up. They would plant a gun, invent witnesses, and charge two of their victims with attempted murder. The NOPD hailed all the shooters on the bridge as heroes. Shots on the Bridge explores one of the most dramatic cases of injustice in the last decade. It reveals the fear that gripped the police of a city fallen into anarchy, the circumstances that led desperate survivors to go to the bridge, and the horror that erupted with the gunfire. It dissects the cover-up that nearly buried the truth and the legal maze that, a decade later, leaves the victims still searching for justice.