Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "women" ...

  • NPR, Medill, Chicago Reporter: Unequal Prison Discipline for Women

    An NPR investigation, with the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University and The Chicago Reporter, included a first-ever analysis of state prison data to show that, across the country, women in prison are disciplined at higher rates than men—generally two to three times more often—for smaller infractions of prison rules.
  • Michigan State University: Capital expenditure

    This project analyzed 2017 campaign finance data reported by Michigan state lawmakers. The initial intent was to determine how much of those funds came from special interest Political Action Committees rather than individual contributions. It blossomed into 10 stories that looked at such things as the difference in fundraising patterns between men and women, Republicans and Democrats. It ranked the partisanship of the state’s PACs, the largest PAC donors, the lawmakers who received the most and least, those who used the most of their own money and those who used no money at all. It discovered that the NRA spends very little on individual state lawmakers and those who break campaign finance laws rarely get hefty fines.
  • KUOW: 11 women accuse Seattle entrepreneur David Meinert of sexual misconduct

    A six-month investigation of multiple allegations of sexual assault and misconduct against a well-known Seattle businessman and politico yields 11 accusers over two decades. After an initial story broke describing the allegations of five anonymous women, six more women came forward – and were willing to use their names.
  • GateHouse Media: Failure to Deliver

    More women are choosing to deliver their babies outside the hospital as a part of a growing national trend, but a nine-month investigation by GateHouse Media and the Sarasota Herald-Tribune found that it’s a deadlier practice than hospital deliveries and leaves families little recourse when something goes wrong.
  • ESPN Outside the Lines/E:60: “Spartan Secrets”

    ESPN’s investigation of sexual assault and abuse claims involving young women and athletes broke through the oft-held defense that the problem was just one bad actor. Our original reporting on sexual abuse claims against former Michigan State and USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar, and how the university dealt with sex assault claims against student athletes, revealed systems that enabled abuse, and involved reports of widespread mishandling – and silencing – of women who said they suffered for years after reporting their assaults. The investigation went well beyond the actions of Nassar, and unveiled a widespread pattern of denial, inaction and information suppression. Michigan State in particular did not want this information out, but through requests for data, documents and a lengthy court battle, along with securing valuable sources, ESPN prevailed in getting much of what it had requested. At the height of the #MeToo movement, ESPN’s reporting gave a voice to the women who had been silenced, and exposed the failures of the people and institutions tasked with protecting them.
  • DARK VALLEY

    Please consider the APTN Investigates episode “Dark Valley” which aired October 19, 2018 on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, for the Open Broadcast Feature award. Reporter/Producer Holly Moore and Reporter Rob Smith travelled to the beautiful Okanagan valley in British Columbia in July 2017 and they quickly realized that the incredible landscape held a dark secret. Five women, seemingly unconnected, had gone missing here in just two years. They vanished within an hour’s drive of one another between Vernon and Sicamous, BC.
  • Comfort Women: Ep1. War Crime, Ep2.The Nation Gave Them Up

    For the 73rd anniversary of the National Liberation Day of Korea, this program aims to report the Japanese government’s denial of forced recruitment comfort women and operation of comfort station by the Japanese military during the Japanese ruling of Korea. This program also traces the whereabouts of the 20 Korean comfort women found in Myitkyina, Myanmar, to suggest how to solve the current comfort women issues. Through the recorded voice files of the interrogations of 4 Japanese officers and soldiers, this program analyses their views on comfort women. The program also found out that Japanese military was solely responsible for forced recruitment and control of comfort women, and the establishment and operation of comfort stations through 783 interrogation reports about 1105 Japanese POW during the three years from 1942. Also, the program offers plans on how to solve the comfort women issue such as international solidarity measures by tracing the 20 Korean comfort women that were dragged to Myitkyina, Myanmar, by the Japanese military to find out whether they are still alive or where they have died, and what our government has done for them.
  • BBC: Anatomy of a Killing

    In July 2018 a horrifying video began to circulate on social media. It shows two women and two young children being led away at gunpoint by a group of Cameroonian soldiers. The captives are blindfolded, forced to the ground, and shot 22 times. The government of Cameroon initially dismissed the video as "fake news." But BBC Africa Eye, through forensic analysis of the footage, proved exactly where this happened, when it happened, and who is responsible for the killings.
  • AP: Cosby on Trial

    Bill Cosby’s conviction was one of the keystone moments in the #metoo movement. After years of abusing women while building a reputation as one of the nation’s most recognizable and likable celebrities, “America’s Dad” was taken to jail in handcuffs. That moment may have never happened had it not been for AP reporter Maryclaire Dale fighting for nearly a decade to ensure Cosby’s statements about drugging and sexually assaulting women became public.
  • 60 Minutes: 100,000 Women

    More than 100,000 American women are suing over a medical device implanted in their bodies called gynecological mesh in what has become the largest multi-district litigation since asbestos. Scott Pelley reports on one manufacturer of the devices, Boston Scientific, which is facing 48,000 lawsuits.