Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "women" ...

  • #MeToo Unmasks the Open Secret of Sexual Abuse in Yoga

    A KQED callout for #MeToo accounts in the Bay Area yoga world and our ensuing nine-month investigation revealed a range of allegations by seven women against five teachers: from inappropriate massage to a violating touch in class, from drugging to sex with a minor. I found that the yoga community is struggling to rein in this sexual misconduct and abuse in its ranks. Some experts believe the lack of oversight of teachers and schools is adding to the problems of an industry experiencing explosive growth, where touch and trust are a fundamental part of the practice.
  • Spartan Secrets

    ESPN’s investigation of sexual assault and abuse claims involving young women and athletes broke through the oft-held defense that the problem was just one bad actor. Our original reporting on sexual abuse claims against former Michigan State and USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar, and how the university dealt with sex assault claims against student athletes, revealed systems that enabled abuse, and involved reports of widespread mishandling – and silencing – of women who said they suffered for years after reporting their assaults. The investigation went well beyond the actions of Nassar, and unveiled a widespread pattern of denial, inaction and information suppression. Michigan State in particular did not want this information out, but through requests for data, documents and a lengthy court battle, along with securing valuable sources, ESPN prevailed in getting much of what it had requested. At the height of the #MeToo movement, ESPN’s reporting gave a voice to the women who had been silenced, and exposed the failures of the people and institutions tasked with protecting them.
  • Deadly Deliveries

    There is more to the story to the abysmal rate of maternal deaths and injuries in the United States than societal ills or women's lifestyles: Hospitals know how to protect mothers. They just aren't doing it. Across the nation, women giving birth needlessly die and suffer life-altering injuries due to substandard medical care.
  • In secretive marijuana industry, whispers of abuse and trafficking

    For decades, California’s Emerald Triangle has provided cover for the nation’s largest marijuana-growing industry. But its forests also hide secrets, among them young women with stories of sexual abuse and exploitation.
  • How the Park Service is Failing Women

    In January 2016, the Department of the Interior released a report revealing that female employees of the River District of the Grand Canyon had been sexually harassed for years, so High Country News staff decided to investigate further. After 11 months of reporting, dozens of tips from current and former employees within the National Park Service, we found that the sexual harassment and gender discrimination issues were far more systematic than the agency.
  • Out of Balance

    A nine-month investigation by The Indianapolis Star found 368 gymnasts had alleged sexual abuse over the last two decades at the hands of coaches and other authority figures — and revealed why: USA Gymnastics, the sport’s national governing body, failed to protect young athletes by employing a policy of dismissing many child sex abuse allegations as hearsay; declining to report allegations to police; failing to track abusive coaches who move from gym to gym; denying responsibility for oversight; and, in some cases, pressuring alleged victims to remain silent. The reporting also emboldened more than 60 women to come forward with allegations of sexual abuse against a longtime USA Gymnastics team physician, who now faces state and federal charges.
  • Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat

    Americans love meat – we have one of the highest rates of consumption in the world. While U.S. shoppers enjoy relatively low prices and an array of choices, there is a high human price tag. The more than 500,000 men and women who work in slaughterhouses and meat processing plants have some of the most dangerous factory jobs in America. The meatpacking industry has made a lot of progress on worker safety since publication of Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” in 1906, but some things remain the same: the work is mostly done by immigrants and refugees; they suffer high rates of injuries and even, sometimes death; and the government lags in oversight. http://harvestpublicmedia.org/content/dangerous-jobs-cheap-meat
  • A Portrait of Donald Trump

    These stories sought to reveal something vital about Donald Trump’s character, by digging for the truth behind his repeated promises to donate to charity. At first, the stories focused on a specific promise, made on the 2016 campaign trail: that Trump had raised $6 million for veterans charities, including a $1 million gift from his own pocket. Then the Post’s investigation broadened, to examine charitable giving across Trump’s lifetime. It revealed, among other things, that Trump had been using his name-branded charitable foundation in ways that seemed to violate both state and federal laws. In the middle of that coverage, The Post also broke news that changed the course of the 2016 campaign: that, in a 2005 video, Trump made extremely lewd remarks about groping women.
  • How the Park Service is Failing Women

    In January 2016, the Department of the Interior released a report revealing that female employees of the River District of the Grand Canyon had been sexually harassed for years, so High Country News staff decided to investigate further. After 11 months of reporting, dozens of tips from current and former employees within the National Park Service, we found that the sexual harassment and gender discrimination issues were far more systematic than the agency would admit.
  • Reset Films: The Syndrome

    The Syndrome is an explosive documentary following the crusade of a group of doctors who have uncovered that Shaken Baby Syndrome, a child abuse theory responsible for hundreds of prosecutions each year in the US, is not scientifically valid. Filmmaker Meryl Goldsmith teams with investigative reporter Susan Goldsmith to document the unimaginable nightmare for those accused and shine a light on the men and women dedicating their lives to defending the prosecuted and freeing the convicted. Shaken baby proponents are determined to silence their critics while an unthinkable number of lives are ruined.