Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "women" ...

  • The Elite Gender Pay Gap

    Gender disparities in income are greater in many white-collar U.S. professions than blue-collar and don’t lend themselves to legislative remedies. http://graphics.wsj.com/gender-pay-gap/
  • The War on Women Is Over—and Women Lost

    The aim of these stories was to take the effects of five years of severe new abortion restrictions out of the realm of abstraction and show readers how drastically these laws had made the experience of getting an abortion more difficult. This was done primarily through interviews with volunteers who help women secure funding for an abortion and arrange their onerous travel schedules; women who had crossed state lines for their abortion; abortion providers struggling to comply with new regulations; and by analyzing internal numbers from abortion clinics who treat large numbers of women from out of state.
  • APS employee drafted anti-solar letter signed by AZ congressmen

    A fight that’s been brewing for years between Arizona’s largest, monopoly energy utility and third-party solar companies has largely taken place behind the scenes or at the state’s energy regulating commission. But in late 2014, Arizona Public Service used its political connections to get members of Arizona’s congressional delegation to sign letters urging the Federal Trade Commission and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to scrutinize and possibly penalize the solar companies over allegations of wrongdoing. What was left out of the letters is that they were written by an Arizona Public Service employee, and that the utility had also previously pumped tens of thousands of dollars into the campaign coffers of those congressmen and congresswomen. The Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting used digital breadcrumbs combined with traditional shoe-leather reporting to uncover this classic case of pay-to-play political maneuvering.
  • The Real War on Families—Why the U.S. Needs Paid Leave Now

    This groundbreaking investigative report reveals the staggering toll on new mothers who must return to work within weeks or days of childbirth. Lerner’s report profiles mothers around the country who went back to work as quickly as 7 days after childbirth, and describes in heartbreaking detail the mental and physical costs of juggling a job and a newborn. Bureau of Labor Statistics data analyzed for In These Times’ report showed that 1 in 4 women return to work within two weeks of childbirth. The report serves as a vital intervention—at a time when calls for paid parental leave in the United States are growing at both the state and federal level—putting the severity of the issue into stark relief by adding a human face to it.
  • Canada’s Jewish Schindler

    VICE News' reporter Rachel Browne investigates the Liberation of Christian and Yazidi Children of Iraq, which claimed to be using the group's funds to rescue hundreds of Yazidi women and girls who had been captured as slaves by Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria. Browne was the first person to report on their concerns and allegations that he was committing a fraud, and actually using his donation money to pay Yazidi families to say he rescued their family members.
  • Harvest of Terror, Parts 1 & 2

    The first story in the series detailed for the first time the worst instance of workplace rape in modern Florida history. The report revealed how a rural sheriff's office and local prosecutors had failed at least five women who reported being sexually assaulted by their bosses at a packing plant. The piece also revealed how the plant's owner ignored multiple warnings that women were being assaulted at the facility. The second piece documented the larger problem of rapes among migrant women in rural Hendry County, Florida. It described unreported recent rapes in the area and showed that the small county's sexual assault rate is significantly higher than the national average.
  • Prosecuting Pregnancy

    The criminalization of drug use in pregnancy is universally opposed by health officials and drug policy experts. But the idea that prison is a fitting punishment for prenatal drug use has become widely accepted in Alabama. Starting in 2006, prosecutors began charging women who used drugs during pregnancy with “chemical endangerment,” a form of child abuse that carries a one to 10-year prison sentence if a baby is unharmed and up to 99 years if a baby dies.
  • Busted! Breast Cancer, Money and the Media

    On Nov. 5, 2015, the Point Reyes Light launched an investigative series on a breast cancer scare that never should have happened. “Busted! Breast cancer, money and the media” dives into the question of who is most at risk of breast cancer. Hint: Contrary to popular belief, it is not wealthy white women. Focused on Marin County, Calif. and similarly affluent communities, the weekly series demystifies how breast cancer risk is calculated and explains how researchers and the media exaggerate risk factors, spreading unwarranted fear of the disease. In the 10-part serial, reporter Peter Byrne explains how scientific data have been manipulated to promote non-scientific agendas to the detriment of women in underserved populations. “Busted!” reveals internal audits showing that data in the California Cancer Registry is not of research quality. The series details how cancer registry officials attempted to derail the investigation. Busted! is changing the conversation about breast cancer risk and policy in the San Francisco Bay Area, and, hopefully, around the nation.
  • The Darren Sharper serial rape case

    This set of stories explains how former NFL star Darren Sharper was able to drug and rape women in multiple states over a few years without being stopped sooner. The stories were made possible by the collection of numerous public records as well as numerous interviews with sources at every level of the case, from witnesses to law enforcement officials, both for the record and not for attribution.
  • Hope and Heartbreak

    They traveled from across the country. A farmer's wife. A lawyer. A chiropractor. Seven women who seemed to have very little in common. But when we started filming their interview, what they shared became painfully obvious. A sense of grief and broken trust. All of them, they told us, were victims of "the cruelest con." Adoption fraud. https://vimeo.com/151819415