Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Atlanta Journal-Constitution" ...

  • Testing the tests

    In a series of stories, Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Heather Vogell revealed the scope, causes and consequences of quality-control breakdowns on standardized tests in U.S. schools. Flawed questions, scoring errors, even mechanical breakdowns have become near common place, Vogell found. But education officials have failed to address the problems, even as lawmakers increased the repercussions for those who fail to make the grade.
  • Cheating Our Children

    After using a sophisticated data analysis to expose anomalous gains on standardized tests in Atlanta Public Schools – anomalies that were shown in 2011 to signal cheating at 44 schools – The Atlanta Journal-Constitution set out in late 2011 to apply its analysis to school test scores nationwide. The resulting investigative series used ground-breaking data analysis and documents that were buried deep in education bureaucrats' files to show that cheating by educators was happening around the nation – clustered largely in urban districts that were under intense pressure to perform in the wake of the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act. The newspaper built a database no one had compiled since NCLB took effect: All standardized-test scores, spanning as many years as available, for 69,000 U.S. elementary and middle schools.
  • Cheating Our Children

    After using a sophisticated data analysis to expose anomalous gains on standardized tests in Atlanta Public Schools -- anomolies that were shown in 2011 to signal chearing at 44 schools -- the Atlanta Journal-Constitution set out in late 2011 to apply its analysis to school test scores nationwide.
  • Scandals In Atlanta Public Schools

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution analyzed of the 2008 standardized test scores in the Atlanta Public School System and laid the foundation for coverage of what is considered the largest case of academic fraud in the nation's history.
  • A Matter of Life or Death

    Examining "how crimes eligible for the death penalty were prosecuted in Georgia over a 10-year period," the Atlanta Journal-Constitution found that sentence varied by circuit court.
  • Wired for waste: A $73 million shopping spree

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution looks at the amount of funds wasted in expensive technology among Atlanta Public Schools. The school system purchased pricey equipment and installed a high-priced unnecessary network for the Internet. The district purchased everything in response to a national program called, E-rate, a program that helps schools initiate an Internet infrastruce, but does not purchase the actual computers. Reporters discovered that the school district spent a lot of money on equipment they didn't need or couldn't use. Because the schools did not take bids, they were often overcharged and chose the most expensive Internet and network components.
  • "Gwinnett County Public Schools Student Discipline Investigation"

    This joint investigation with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution found that Georgia's largest school district had been undererporting student discipline incidents by more than 85 percent. A reporter's review of a database following the first year of mandatory reporting by public school districts prompted the investigation. The data from a number of school districts seemed low. Subsequent data analysis revealed the magnitude of the problem. Following the reports several state agencies opened their own investigations into the school district.
  • The Uncertain Season: The Farm Crisis in Georgia

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's series on the farm crisis in Georgia. It takes a look at farm families and the effects of drought.
  • The price of a cure

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports on the story of a local teen cured of sickle cell through an experimental stem cell transplant performed almost two years ago by Emory University doctors. "The transplant saved Keone's life, but the price of this medical breakthrough had been tremendous and seemingly endless."
  • State Law Shields Child Sex Offenders

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports on "first offender status" in Georgia, designed to give first-time criminals a break in sentencing. The paper's analysis of state records "shows at least 3,740 people in Georgia have been granted first offender status for sex crimes, some so serious they were sentenced to prison." Such people aren't listed in the state's sex offender registry or on the Web site of the Department of Corrections, either.