Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "CNBC" ...

  • LinkedIn: Closing The Gap In Finance & Entertainment

    In the era of #MeToo and Times’ Up, LinkedIn partnered with CNBC to get a sense of the state of gender across the American workplace. We received more than 2,000 responses from LinkedIn members working in finance, entertainment and the motion picture/film industry in the U.S. Our questions tried to cover both the alleged problems as well as potential solutions, asking respondents to weigh in on if their careers have been impacted by the issues surfaced by the #MeToo and Time's Up movements and their ideas for how to make the industry more inclusive. We then interviewed more than 100 members across the industry to get their analysis through reported featured on the issues. To date, thousands of additional professionals both on and off LinkedIn have joined the larger conversation about the results and their implications for the American workplace.
  • LinkedIn: Closing The Gap In Finance & Entertainment

    In the era of #MeToo and Times’ Up, LinkedIn partnered with CNBC to get a sense of the state of gender across the American workplace. We received more than 2,000 responses from LinkedIn members working in finance, entertainment and the motion picture/film industry in the U.S. Our questions tried to cover both the alleged problems as well as potential solutions, asking respondents to weigh in on if their careers have been impacted by the issues surfaced by the #MeToo and Time's Up movements and their ideas for how to make the industry more inclusive. We then interviewed more than 100 members across the industry to get their analysis through reported featured on the issues. To date, thousands of additional professionals both on and off LinkedIn have joined the larger conversation about the results and their implications for the American workplace.
  • Crypto Investigation

    As the crypto craze exploded in 2017, one public company stood out as its stock price skyrocketed, prompting our investigation that found serious red flags about the company and a behind-the-scenes major investor.
  • CNBC: Oceans of Crime

    This is a crime story, set in the most open and lawless place on earth – the ocean. The perpetrators traffic in an illegal product – seafood. Their front-line workers are literally slaves. And almost anyone who buys salmon, canned tuna, or pet food is helping to fund this outlaw industry, whether they realize it or not. In this documentary about illegal fishing, CNBC illustrates the often shocking, unethical path much of our seafood takes from the water to our dinner plates, and what is being done to curb the often monumental abuses that occur along the way. Because illegal fishing is both a human rights and an environmental issue, CNBC’s goal was to explore the entire supply process and introduce all those involved – fishermen suffering abuse, the perpetrators, the would-be rescuers and enforcers, and the consumers who make it all possible, whether they know it or not.
  • Michael LaForgia

    This report was the first interview with Swiss bank whistleblower Bradley Birkenfeld since the banker had been released from federal prison and awarded $104 million for his role in revealing how thousands of Americans evaded taxes with secret Swiss bank accounts. Birkenfeld had been released years earlier, but had not spoken publicly about his massive new wealth. In our interview, the Boston-born banker gave a tour of his new luxury box at the Boston Garden, showed off his new Porsche, railed against the US Department of Justice, and alleged that unnamed American political figures had secret bank accounts in Switzerland. http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375411 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375414 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375403 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375407 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375435 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000375431
  • Q1 GDP Mystery

    In a series of print and video pieces for CNBC, Senior Economics Reporter Steve Liesman discovered longstanding issues in the government’s reporting of first quarter GDP growth, prompting responses from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, professional economists, and Federal Reserve officials. http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000380822 http://www.cnbc.com/2015/04/21/the-mysterious-case-of-weak-1q-gdp-for-30-years.html
  • PUSHING PAIN: PROFITS BEFORE PATIENTS

    The amount of painkillers dispensed in the U.S. nearly quadrupled from 1999-2010 even though the amount of pain Americans have reported has not changed, resulting in what the Centers for Disease Control and prevention calls an epidemic which takes over twenty thousand lives each year. This was an impetus for Reporter Dina Gusovsky to investigate a publicly traded specialty pharmaceutical company called Insys Therapeutics, which is accused of contributing to these grim statistics. It’s main revenue generating drug is a highly addictive opiate one hundred times more powerful that morphine, which the FDA says should only be used for late stage cancer pain; however, the company is now being investigated in at least six states for pushing the drug far beyond cancer patients, engaging in kickback schemes, off-label marketing, and other illegal business practices all in attempt to grow profits. Two days after our report first aired, which included exclusive interviews with whistleblowers and investigators, the company’s CEO resigned. http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000444339&play=1 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000445892&play=1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9Uy3eDqzUc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP28vnux3yI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXFetMnNJSk
  • Remington Under Fire: The Reckoning

    A new investigation reveals how America’s oldest gun company has used and allegedly abused the courts to hide an alleged design defect in its most popular product. At least two dozen deaths and hundreds of injuries have been linked to inadvertent firings of Remington’s Model 700 bolt-action rifle. The investigation, which builds on CNBC’s previous reporting on the Remington Arms Company, also reveals how other companies in a wide variety of industries are using similar tactics to hide potentially life saving information from the public. http://www.cnbc.com/2015/12/08/deadly-secrets-companies-using-courts-at-your-peril.html http://www.cnbc.com/remington-under-fire/ http://www.cnbc.com/2015/12/08/want-your-remington-gun-fixed-heres-what-you-need-to-know.html http://www.cnbc.com/2015/12/08/remington-under-fire-the-reckoning.html http://www.cnbc.com/2015/12/19/under-oath-inventor-of-controversial-remington-trigger-speaks.html http://www.cnbc.com/2015/12/08/defective-or-not-the-government-cant-recall-your-gun.html
  • VA Whistleblower Retailiation

    CNBC has uncovered more allegations of fraud, cover-ups, and intimidation at the Department of Veterans Affairs. We got an exclusive look into how management manipulated patient wait times and what the VA did to retaliate against those who were unwilling to game the system and cook the books. CNBC's Dina Gusovsky reports.
  • Collision Course

    According to the Federal Motor Carrier Administration (FMCSA), nearly 4,000 people died in trucking accidents in 2012 – up 18% from 2009. But what is being done to ensure better safety on U.S. roads? "Collision Course," a four-part investigative series reported by Eamon Javers, shines a light on the dangers of crashes that involve long-haul trucks. CNBC breaks down the numbers highlighting that 20% of trucks (over 2 million) inspected in 2012 had out of service violations – faulty brakes, bad tires and shouldn't have been on the road. And, nearly 5% of truck drivers (171,000) had enough violations to be pulled from behind the wheel.