Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "California" ...

  • Nursing homes unmasked

    An investigation into who owns California nursing homes; how nursing homes often hide ownership information; how the same problems often persist across nursing home ownership chains and how state regulators consistently focus on single homes instead of chains.
  • Flushing Money

    The story details how California’s capital city, Sacramento, has delayed the mandated installation of water meters by more than a decade by adding on hundreds of millions of dollars of unnecessary, wasteful, often dangerous construction.
  • Hydrogen Energy: Pollution or Solution

    This is the result of a two-month investigation into a proposed, federally-funded "green-energy" power plant in the middle of California's Central Valley. This plant planned to gasify coal and use new technology to diminish the amount of CO2 released into the air. This would be done by using carbon sequestration in nearby oil fields, creating jobs and energy for the valley. However this report shows that while this power plant reduces CO2 emissions and creates dozens of temporary jobs, the additional environmental impacts are substantial. The plant plans to truck in coal dust past schools and neighborhoods, use millions of gallons of water a day in drought-stricken farming country, pollute the air with particulate pollution in the most polluted air region in the country, store hazardous chemicals near schools and homes, fill landfills at an alarming rate, AND at the end of it all the plant will produce at times NO electricity.
  • Exposing the Unknown Dangers to Children: CA's Broken Day Care Oversight System

    In an ongoing year-long joint investigation, NBC Bay Area and The Center for Investigative Reporting peeled back the layers of California’s ineffective and antiquated day care oversight system, revealing parents’ little access to simple inspection information, infrequent checkups by state regulators and disorganization at the highest levels of state government. In a groundbreaking team effort, the journalists spent hundreds of hours scanning and organizing thousands of child care inspection documents, creating databases to analyze that information and then posting them online for the first time in California. The reporting brought transparency to an opaque and confusing system and put the problems into the public’s eye, leading to significant action by elected officials and a change in state law.
  • Substation INSECURITY

    This groundbreaking investigation exposed serious and what experts called critical failures in the security at key electric substations in Northern and Central California. Many high level, informed sources have said substations in California and throughout the United States offer terrorists the opportunity to significantly impact the future of our country and our economy. The NBC Bay Area Investigative Unit working on tips from high ranking government and former government sources spent five months gathering data, identifying critical substations, locating key experts and testing the level of security at electric substations.
  • The Surveillance State of California

    The investigation centered around our discovery that at least seven California law enforcement agencies were using controversial high-tech cell phone tracking technology without the public's knowledge and no judicial oversight. They uncovered police from San Diego to Sacramento have been using fake cell towers, known as "Stingrays", for years and in complete secret. In fact, Sacramento judges and prosecutors had no idea the technology was being used until we approached them about the story. Grant applications obtained during our investigation showed law enforcement agencies used terrorism as the justification for purchasing Stingray technology, when in reality they were using the device for people suspected of far more routine crimes, including drugs and robberies.
  • Safe from War | Dead at Home

    This three-day series was the culmination of a yearlong project that took an unprecedented look at the untimely deaths of Marines in Southern California’s High Desert. We set out to produce something revelatory, and ultimately discovered trends that have never been reported before, and were likely unknown even to the military itself. Our series discovered that the rural Marine base in Twentynine Palms, CA suffered more non-combat deaths on American soil than war casualties between 2007 and 2012. Our reporting revealed that the base had an extremely high rate of off-duty car crashes, which was worsened by a culture of heavy drinking and a reckless, “invincible” mindset held by many Marines. The series also showed that Marines who took their own life at the Twentynine Palms base were twice as likely to be under the influence of alcohol as the average Marine suicide.
  • The Fight of His Life

    "The Fight of his Life”: Coachella boxer Angel Osuna struggles to rebound from a severe brain injury from his final bout as he deals with $1M in medical bills. “Audit: Athletic commission failed its athletes”: Public records show the California State Athletic Commission, entrusted with the safety of amateur and professional boxers, has mismanaged two key funds for several years.
  • Rialto Unified Holocaust essay assignment

    The 26,000-student Rialto Unified School District in Southern California asked its 2,000 eighth graders this spring to write an in-class essay assignment on whether or not the Holocaust occurred, and gave students print-outs from a Holocaust denial site as one of three "credible sources" they were required to base their work on. The district initially claimed that no students had denied the Holocaust occurred, but after the students' essays were obtained through a California Public Records Act request, it turned out that dozens of students had done so, some of them earning high marks along the way. The revelation led to international condemnation, the establishment of a new lesson plan for the rising ninth graders, the departure of high-ranking officials within the district and may have contributed to the school board president choosing to not run for reelection.
  • The Putah Creek Legacy

    This series explored the history, impact, and implications of a 25-year, $12 million river restoration project along Lower Putah Creek, a small waterway that runs along the border of Yolo and Solano counties in northern California. Putah Creek has been managed for human use for almost 150 years: a new channel rerouted it around the town of Davisville in the 1870s, levees were erected along it in the 1940s, and a dam halted and diverted its flow in the 1950s. Its story mimics hundreds of other rivers, streams and creeks throughout California. It would be largely unremarkable save for a lawsuit that thrust it to the forefront of restoration ecology.