Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Dallas Morning News" ...

  • Pain & Profit

    Pain & Profit exposed systemic problems with the way Texas provides health care for its most vulnerable citizens through Medicaid managed care. The series showed how years of inept state regulation allowed corporations to profit even as they skimped on treatment for more than 700,000 sick kids and disabled adults, with life-threatening results. And how Texas health officials hid the full extent of the problems from the public.
  • The Dallas Morning News: Pain & Profit

    Healthcare companies made billions of dollars while systematically denying life-sustaining drugs and treatments to thousands of sick kids and elderly and disabled Texans. The companies profited by stalling or denying nursing services, medical equipment and therapy. And for lying about how many doctors they had available to treat patients. State officials knew about horrific failures but covered it all up.
  • The Dallas Morning News: Atmos

    A Dallas Morning News investigation showing how more than two dozen homes across North and Central Texas have blown up since 2006 because of leaking natural gas along lines owned and operated by Atmos Energy Corp. Nine people died in these explosions; at least 22 others were badly injured. The News' investigation also showed how the state agency that is supposed to regulate gas companies in Texas frequently let Atmos Energy off the hook, even in explosions that killed people.
  • Bled Dry

    When local hospitals shut their doors, communities usually blame poor economics or heavy regulation. But The Dallas Morning News found another reason for closures: Businessmen who bought ailing hospitals and siphoned off their cash, often leaving them vacant hulks in devastated towns. What may seem at first to be an unlikely scenario has played out not just in Texas, but across the country. One owner left a trail of 13 wrecked hospitals in seven states. In Nevada, a doctor who put down $10,000 to take over the only hospital between Reno and Las Vegas pulled out at least $8 million before the cash-starved medical center shut down. Federal regulators and most states don’t vet people who take over hospitals, The News discovered, and there is little financial oversight. Even when patient care suffers at these stripped facilities, regulators seldom hold those who profited accountable.
  • State Police Secrets and Surveillance

    The Texas Department of Public Safety and politicians for years worked behind the scenes to create a system of surveillance, casting a net that included potential criminals and everyday innocent citizens. DPS, the state police, began covering up secrets and limiting media access when The Dallas Morning News Watchdog Desk began investigating. That led to the agency sending private memos to state legislators and staff in an attempt to stop or discredit The News', and other media outlets, story publications.
  • Hidden Threat: The Kissing bug

    This investigation by KXAS-TV and The Dallas Morning News revealed kissing bugs may pose a much more significant threat to human health in Texas than the CDC has ever indicated. The bugs carry a dangerous parasite, a silent killer that can lead to heart failure and death. They have already infected hundreds of thousands of people in South America, Central America and Mexico. But, our team of reporters and producers discovered kissing bugs have also infected at least ten people in Texas. A fact revealed for the first time exclusively in the first report. Hundreds of dogs in the state are sick and many are dying. Even more concerning, the human and animal toll may be much higher than the numbers show, because few people or dogs are ever tested for the disease. This series was also the first to demonstrate how the nation’s blood supply may be at risk from kissing bugs and a lack of regulations to prevent the spread of the parasite through blood transfusions. Our reports had an immediate impact, alerting thousands of people to the presence of the bugs and the dangers they bring. Hundreds of Texans responded by sending bugs to the state lab for testing and other news organizations across the country picked up our reports taking our findings to an even wider audience. https://youtu.be/a2xykL8ixSs
  • An Inside Track

    A groundbreaking investigation by Dallas Morning News reporters Ed Timms and Kevin Krause exposed questionable practices by a nonprofit agency created by local governments in part to avoid public scrutiny of the certification process for minority- and woman-owned businesses.. The reporters and their newspaper fought a lengthy legal battle for more than a year that resulted in a strong legal precedent that may deter other governments from trying to circumvent open records law by forming nonprofits. The investigation revealed that the local governments had relied on a temporary employment firm had operated the nonprofit agency for more than a decade. Employees of that private firm certified their own company as a minority-owned business, even as it won millions in contracts from those same governments. The employees also decided whether their company's competitors and subcontractors got certified. It also disclosed that the company, and other contractors, failed to adequately screen temporary employees provided to Dallas County.
  • Explosion at West

    Tons of ammonium nitrate fertilizer at a central Texas plant exploded last April with the force of a small earthquake. The blast came just two days after the Boston Marathon and, in the national media, was overshadowed by events in the Northeast. While not the result of a terrorist attack, the explosion in West, Texas, was far larger and deadlier, and raised more significant public safety issues. In a series of investigative reports over eight months, The Dallas Morning News revealed that ammonium nitrate remains virtually unregulated by federal and state governments, despite its well-known explosive potential. (Timothy McVeigh used it in 1995 to blow up an Oklahoma City federal building.) Efforts to strengthen oversight have been blocked by industry lobbyists and government gridlock, The News found, even as the Pentagon sought bans on ammonium nitrate in Afghanistan and Pakistan. In pro-business, anti-regulation Texas, the federal government’s lax oversight meant no oversight at all. West Fertilizer Co. – scene of the disaster – violated almost every safety best practice. No state agency was charged with preventing an ammonium nitrate blast. There was no public registry of companies that handled the compound, even though many facilities are near homes and schools. Texas prohibits most counties from having fire codes and does not require facilities like West to obtain liability insurance. Gov. Rick Perry and other state politicians, who created this wide-open environment, washed their hands of the problem. They said West was a tragic accident that no amount of regulation could have prevented. The News’ findings, however, proved otherwise.
  • Chronic Condition

    Parkland Memorial Hospital is one of the largest public hospitals in the nation and the safety net for thousands of poor and minority patients in North Texas. But a multiyear investigation by The Dallas Morning News revealed systemic patient harm and prompted a federal crackdown that threatened to close Parkland.
  • Texas Schools/Racial Divisions

    This was a 6-part series reported and written by students at The University of Texas at Austin and published in The Dallas Morning News (in print and online) and in Reporting Texas (an online news site at The University of Texas at Austin). The series examined the "resegregation" of public schools -- and how little had changed in public schools since the Brown v. Board of Education ruling in the 1950s ordering the end of segregated classrooms. The groundbreaking work involved deep dives into data, pressing public officials for accountability, exploring the inequities in the public education system.