Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Duval County" ...

  • Walking While Black

    “Walking While Black,” a meticulously researched and powerful reporting project, showed Jacksonville's enforcement of pedestrian violations to be racially disproportionate. Using hard-won data from a variety of local and state agencies, Topher Sanders and Ben Conarck, both veterans of reporting in Jacksonville, showed the disparities across every category of pedestrian tickets in Duval County. They then found those ticketed, and chronicled the impact — on their driver’s licenses, on their credit ratings, on their day to day ability to work and raise families in a city notorious for its lack of adequate pedestrian infrastructure.
  • Sex Offenders Near Bus Stops

    WTEV-TV found that sex offenders in Duval County, Florida, were living in areas surrounding school bus stops, often within two blocks. This included offenders who had targeted children.
  • Duval County School Security Investigation

    The stories exposed illegal purchases and questionable hiring by the Duval County school security office, headed by Assistant Superintendent Joe Seager. The stories helped spur a federal investigation that led to the indictment of Seager and prominent local businessman Norman Abraham on charges of extortion, mail fraud and money laundering. Major findings: Seager tried to steer contracts, made large purchases without board approval, took kickbacks, bought faulty security equipment, got his job through political favoritism and hired a security official who'd been caught running naked through a school gym.
  • Teacher Series

    WJXT-TV found that about 200 teachers in Duval County had criminal records, including some who had drug, DUI convictions and an elementary teacher judged to be criminally insane. The series revealed that in many cases the school system knew about the records yet allowed him/her to stay in the classrooms. As a result of the series, the school system gave the local sherriff's office fingerprints of all its employees, Mar. 21 - 23, 1994.
  • (Untitled)

    Florida Times-Union (Jacksonville) looks at the work hours of judges in Duval County, Fla., and finds that many of them routinely worked six-, five-and even four-hour days before going home to work on their personal projects, June 14, 1992.