Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Indians" ...

  • Eskimo Guinea Pigs

    Cable News Network reveals that an Air Force field laboratory in Alaska did medical experiments with radiation on over 100 Eskimos and Athabascan Indians; the subjects were uninformed of the dangers and not asked for consent, May 3, 1993.
  • (Untitled)

    Detroit News exposes how thousands of people with very little or no Native American heritage are entering U.S. universities as American Indians, simply by checking a box on their enrollment forms, and getting minority admission preferences, scholarships and jobs, April 1992. * MI St. John Yaquinto
  • Third-World Sanitation in 20th Century Alaska: Villagers drink from dirty wells, haul sewage by hand--and get sick because of it

    Anchorage Daily News documents the deplorable drinking water and sanitation conditions in many of Alaska's Eskimo and Native American villages, and the resulting health risks to thousands of people; more than 100 communities in Alaska have no running water or flush toilets, and drinking water is carried to homes, untreated, directly from rivers and lakes.
  • The Price of Power

    Hartford Courant examines the effects of Hydro-Quebec, a government-owned electric company that is reshaping remote Canadian north country to provide power; rivers are being diverted, reservoirs created, forests drowned, and the Cree Indians are saying goodbye to a way of life; related articles from dams affecting Native American lifestyles.
  • A Tribe on the Threshold

    New Times (Phoenix) visits the Hualapai tribe in northwest Arizona and finds rampant alcoholism and drug abuse and unemployment that hovers around 80 percent; uranium mining slated to begin on the reservation could bring much-needed revenue, but new problems.
  • Maine Indians: Legacy of the Land Claims.

    Bangor Daily News looks at the life of Maine Indians nearly ten years after the signing of the Indian Land Claims Settlement, an agreement that provided Maine's Native Americans with federal money to buy state land and develop industry and education, and finds both success and failure among tribe members and controversy over the use of tribal funds, Sept. 9 - 15, 1989.
  • (Untitled)

    APF Reporter details the deadly cost of alcohol abuse by Native Americans, Fall 1989.
  • Alaska Bush, A People in Peril

    Anchorage Daily News runs 10 - day series that explores the cultural devastation of the Indians, Eskimos and Aleuts of Alaska, a devastation shown in pary by suicides, homicides, accidents, domestic violence, fetal alcohol syndrome, sexual abuse and alcoholism, Jan. 10 - 19, 1988.
  • Eight Items Taken from History Museum

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch discloses the Missouri Historical Society's collection of American Indian artifacts--once considered among the nation's best--has been depleted through irregular practices, casual oversight and neglect; also uncovers questionable dealings between the society's director and a private art dealer, August - December 1987.
  • (Untitled)

    Stuart (Fla.) News series examines the adjustment of Guatemala's Kanjobal Indians, a primitive people who were driven from their homeland by civil war, to their new life in Indiantown, Fla., Oct. 13-17, 1985.