Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Los Angeles" ...

  • 134 Cases, $36 Million: Inside Sexual Misconduct At America's Biggest County Government

    A first-of-its-kind investigation into Los Angeles County revealed more than one hundred sexual misconduct cases that ended with settlements or judgments paid for with public funds.
  • Big Money, Unlikely Donors

    Los Angeles Times journalists combined shoe-leather reporting with sophisticated digital tools to unravel the tangled web of political donors linked to a controversial $72-million apartment project, resulting in enhanced scrutiny.
  • California National Guard Bonus Enlistment Scandal

    Stories by the Los Angeles Times that described how the California National Guard was trying to recover millions of dollars in enlistment bonuses from nearly 10,000 soldiers and veterans – including some who had been wounded in combat – spurred the secretary of Defense to suspend the program, Congress to agree to waive most of the debts and the president to sign the bill into law.
  • Invisible Disaster

    For 16 weeks, the potent climate gas methane poured from a broken natural gas well in Los Angeles County. It would become the largest such accident in U.S. history. It drove thousands of sickened people from their homes, spurred dozen of lawsuits, cost a Fortune 500 company hundreds of millions of dollars and set back California climate efforts.
  • The Wet Prince of Bel Air

    During a time of severe drought, Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting wanted to learn more about the users of the most water in California. Reporters found that one homeowner in Los Angeles’ posh Bel Air neighborhood had used 11.8 million gallons of water in a single year during a drought emergency and that 4 of the top 10 known mega water users were also in Bel Air. But city officials wouldn’t reveal who those customers were. So in a follow-up story, Reveal used satellite analysis and public records to identify the seven most likely culprits. https://www.revealnews.org/article/the-wet-prince-of-bel-air-who-is-californias-biggest-water-guzzler/
  • LAPD underreported serious assaults, skewing crime stats for 8 years

    A Los Angeles Times machine-learning analysis found that the Los Angeles Police Department misclassified an estimated 14,000 serious assaults as minor offenses in an eight-year period, artificially lowering the city's crime levels. Reporters used an algorithm to learn key words in crime report narratives that identified offenses as serious of minor, and then used it to review nearly eight years of data in search of classification errors.
  • Officer Involved

    Officer Involved is an in-depth multi-platform series about when and how officers in Los Angeles County choose to use deadly force – and whether they’re held accountable. We built a comprehensive database of all shootings involving law enforcement--whether fatal or not--in L.A. County over a five-year period and provide to the public for the first time, insights on who is getting shot and under what circumstances. We found one in four people shot were unarmed and black people are shot at three times their proportion of the population. We also found prosecutors haven't charged an officer for an on-duty shooting in 15 years.
  • Getting Away with Murder

    From 2000 through 2010, nearly half the homicides in Los Angeles County went unsolved. Justice remains elusive for families of the victims. A groundbreaking 18-month investigation puts a face on those killed and highlights the toll exacted on loved ones still grasping for answers.
  • Mexican Mafia Killer and the LAPD

    This series started off with a tip: Los Angeles police were bringing a high-profile criminal to a private business event in downtown L.A. That criminal turned out to be Rene "Boxer" Enriquez, a former shot-caller for the Mexican Mafia sentenced to life in prison for two killings. That the LAPD would use public resources to bring him to a private event was only the first surprise — we soon learned Enriquez had a cozy relationship with law enforcement officials and was set to be paroled. We spent weeks digging into his background, contacting the children of one of his victims, interviewing people who knew him, reading court records and transcripts outlining his crimes. The reporting by The Times ultimately prompted two investigations by the LAPD, including one into a high-profile deputy chief. The governor also decided to deny Enriquez parole and keep him behind bars.
  • Deadly Outbreaks, Dangerous Scopes

    The Los Angeles Times exposed how outbreaks of deadly superbug infections were caused by flaws in a medical device, and revealed that its maker failed to alert doctors about the risks to patients.