Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Los Angeles" ...

  • Rehab Racket

    Taxpayers spend tens of millions of dollars each year in California on drug rehab centers designed to help low-income addicts. The clinics make their money billing for every client counseled. But CNN and The Center for Investigative Reporting exposed glaring and systemic failures in the program, including pervasive fraud – reporting that led to scores of clinics getting shut down. In coverage rolled out over several months, the team showed that taxpayers had spent at least $94 million over two years on Los Angeles-area clinics with clear signs of fraud or questionable billing. Regulators who could have stopped the abuses instead let misdeeds multiply. As a result of "Rehab Racket," the official overseeing the program apologized for the poor oversight and the state shut down a total of 177 clinic locations. Officials referred 69 clinics to the state Department of Justice, which opened criminal investigations.
  • Rehab Racket

    Taxpayers spend tens of millions of dollars each year in California on private drug rehab centers designed to help low-income addicts. The clinics make their money billing for every client counseled. But reporters from The Center for Investigative Reporting and CNN exposed glaring and systemic failures in the program, including pervasive fraud – reporting that led to scores of clinics getting shut down. In coverage rolled out over several months, the team showed that taxpayers had spent at least $94 million over two years on Los Angeles-area clinics with clear signs of fraud or questionable billing. Clinic directors pressured counselors to pad bills with “ghost clients” they never saw. Clinic staff bribed some of the region’s poorest residents to show up for counseling they didn’t need. In an ultimate irony, addicts were enticed to attend rehab sessions with gifts of booze and cigarettes. Regulators who could have stopped the abuses instead let misdeeds multiply. CIR reporters Christina Jewett and Will Evans teamed with CNN senior investigative producer Scott Zamost and investigative correspondent Drew Griffin to produce our series, “Rehab Racket,” on multiple platforms. Jewett and Evans wrote the stories for CIR and CNN. The cable network produced video that aired on “Anderson Cooper 360” and both of our websites.
  • Corruption at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

    From the Summer Olympics to papal visits to Super Bowls, the iconic peristyle of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum long symbolized many of the city’s proudest hours. Now, because of the work of three Los Angeles Times reporters, the stately columns have become an emblem of one of the worst corruption scandals in recent Southern California history. The stories produced by Rong-Gong Lin II, Paul Pringle and Andrew Blankstein have led directly to the felony indictments of three public officials, the nation’s No. 1 promoter of rave concerts, another prominent music executive and a government contractor. A second misdemeanor case has been filed against two other Coliseum employees. The charges spelled out in the indictments mirror the reporters' findings – tales of bribery, embezzlement, kickbacks and conflict of interest. They allege that the taxpayers who own the Coliseum were bilked out of some $2 million and perhaps much more.
  • Dying for Relief

    A Los Angeles Times investigation showed how rogue physicians and pharmacists profiteer at the expense of patients’ safety, and in many cases patients’ lives, and how law enforcement officials and medical regulators have failed to prevent it.
  • Artful Dodger: Josh Macciello Convinced L.A. He Was in Line to Buy The Dodgers. But He Was Really A Fraud.

    "The Artful Dodger" was the first story to break through the local media groupthink and expose Josh Macciello for what he was -- to report that, instead of being a legitimate contender to purchase the Los Angeles Dodgers, the 36-year-old was a fraud. He did not have billions of dollars. He did not have rights to any gold mines. He had, instead, a conviction for drug dealing and a history of making promises he couldn't keep. This story pulled no punches. It exposed Macciello for what he was -- and made it all but impossible for him to use the publicity he'd generated by fooling other media organizations as a way to swindle even more investors.
  • Los Angeles VA Has Made Millions on Rental Deals

    This story is about one of the most fought-over pieces of property in Los Angeles, the 400 acre Veterans Affairs Medical Center campus in West Los Angeles. It’s in an affluent neighborhood and has been a target of developers. But with many unused buildings, it’s also been coveted as a place to house some of L.A.’s 8,000 homeless veterans. That was the original use of the land, which was donated for an Old Soldiers’ Home in the late 19th century. The VA has not acted on plans announced in 2007 to begin rehabbing unused buildings there for housing for homeless vets. Meanwhile, it’s rented out land and buildings to commercial enterprises. There is no public accounting for this income. Through FOIA and other documents, we found that the VA is renting out the property using a law intended for sharing health care resources, though the renters are non-health related commercial enterprises. We were also able to estimate that the VA has taken in at least 28 million and possibly more than 40 million dollars over the past dozen years, far more than the cost of re-habbing a building to house homeless vets.
  • The Shame of the Boy Scouts

    The Los Angeles Times made public for the first time thousands of files documenting sexual abuse of Boy Scouts by their troop leaders, resulting in reforms that will help ensure the protection of children.
  • Spy Drones Aiding Police

    Government surveillance drones have been used, with no public notice, to assist local police departments inside the U.S. find suspects and conduct. A Los Angeles Times/ Tribune Co. Washington Bureau investigation uncovered for the first time over two dozen uses of the Department of Homeland Security drones to help local law enforcement in North Dakota, where two of the department's nine Predator B aircraft are based.
  • All Is Not Forgiven

    The investigation found that reforms promised by the Vatican after the priest sex abuse scandal were ignored. Only when confronted with the findings of the investigation did the Archdiocese of Los Angeles admit that its background check of priests did not go beyond reviewing a letter from a former superior.
  • A Bad Cop and His Wife

    The investigation uncovered how a Los Angeles detective and his wife ripped off people from coast to coast. The detective would use his influence as a police officer to help his wife's furniture and design business. She would take customers money but not deliver the goods.