Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Medicaid" ...

  • Is Fraud Poisoning Home Health Care

    Business Week reports that "after an extensibve investigation into the rapidly expanding home health-care industry, Business Week found rampant fraud and abuse. Problems ranged from financial scams ripping off millions of dollars from Medicaid and Medicare to instances of neglect and abuse of elderly or incapacitated patients by untrained, unqualified, or unlicensed home-care workers. Business Week discovered that many of the problems uncovered are an outgrowth of lax federal and state regulations and too little oversight of comapanies' practices, and ineffective industry groups."
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    The Lexington Herald-Leader series uncovers a state Medicaid system that issues checks to health care providers with minimal oversight by Medicaid staff or legislative budget committees; found that many providers, such as ambulance companies, doctors and dentists, benefit from and encourage fraudulent behavior by patients. The paper also found that ambulance companies used money, free cigarettes or side trips to entice Medicaid patients to use their ambulances, June - December 1994.
  • Florida's Medicaid mess wastes $200 million a year

    The Palm Beach Post investigation of the state Medicaid system finds rampant abuse with doctors, hospitals and other health care providers bilk the system of at least $200 million a year; found one doctor who routinely billed for more extensive examinations than he performed and pharmacists and drug store owners who steal millions of dollars.
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    "Profits from Pain" documents how Florida officials created a separate and dangerously unequal health care systme for 360,000 of the state's poorest residents, mostly women and children.
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    Commercial Appeal investigated Memphis optometrists who use high-pressure sales tactics to generate Medicaid patients and profits. Optometrists prescribed unneeded glasses to children. State rules prohibit doctors soliciting patients; Three government agencies investigated the doctors and disiciplinary action was recommended.
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    The Washington Post details the reasons for the unprecedented growth of the government's health program for the poor; the series attributes the rising costs to the manipulation of the federal cost-sharing mechanism by state governments, lawsuits by nursing home organizations, and a secretive effort by Washington lawmakers to expand Medicaid by exploiting the federal budget process between 1984-1990, January - February 1994.
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    The Louisville Courier-Journal reveals that more drugs containing codeine were sold per person in Kentucky than in any other state; the series also reveals that the state is a hotbed of prescription-drug abuse, complete with pill-pushing doctors, drug-seeking patients and lax oversight and enforcement. Evidence of drug abuse was found in the Medicaid program, even though most irregularities are not investigated. One of the doctors profiled in the series became the subject of a criminal investigation, Oct. 30 - Nov. 1, 1994.
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    Wired reveals how the explosive growth of computer systems in state Departments of Moter Vehicles will eventually threaten citizen privacy; as the systems become more sophisticated and officials incorporate more information, use the stick of license revocation to enforce more laws and use drivers licenses for other purposes, like welfare or Medicaid, citizens must deal with an increasing presence from government, February 1994.
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    Washington Post Weekly describes how Medicaid is a budget timebomb, with efforts to cut its budget ending in expanding it; shows how a few influential congressmen have unrealistically inflated the number of people covered and discusses implications for President Clinton's health care reform proposals, Feb. 7-13, 1994.
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    Chicago Reporter exposes how Illinois Gov. Jim Edgar's proposed health plan would fail to insure any of the state's citizens currently without insurance, instead promising more profits to insurance companies by only helping people already covered when changing jobs and small businesses; details the key players in the health care reform process and points out that the discrepency in insurance places the burden overwhelmingly on African-Americans, April 1994.