Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Middle East" ...

  • Yemen’s Dirty War: An Associated Press Investigation

    A year-long investigative series revealing how key players in Yemen’s dirty war have engaged in atrocities and corruption — torturing prisoners, deploying child soldiers and stealing food aid intended for the starving.
  • NYT Mag: From Arizona to Yemen - The Journey of an American Bomb

    In one narrative feature, rendering the world’s worst humanitarian catastrophe on a small, personal scale, in order to make it feel relevant, tactile, and immediate to western readers. The hope was to collapse the distance and let Western readers feel what it was like to be the victim of an airstrike in Yemen, and to be a patient in hospital deprived of resources by a blockade. We wanted the crisis to feel familiar and close, rather than distant and exotic. By investigating the provenance of a bomb used and telling the story of its journey from an American assembly line to the planes above people we’d come to care about, showing readers how intertwined their own lives are with the lives of Yemenis.
  • Aging aircraft and hidden threats

    While the Navy spent big over the past 20 years on experimental mine hunting technology that may never work, it stopped investing in its mine-hunting Sea Dragon helicopters, which have spent the better part of a year grounded due to mechanical problems after a series of deadly accidents. Now the service is trying to play catch-up. The Sea Dragon’s troubles are a symptom of a much larger problem: America’s military aircraft have been flown hard during 15 years of combat in the Middle East, and nearly all of their next-generation replacements are years behind schedule and millions over budget. The result: Much of the nation’s fleet is flying far longer than planned and in need of critical maintenance to keep them going. Their investigation found that the United State's Marine and Navy aircraft fleet has dismal readiness rates, as evidenced in an internal report obtained by the IRP and Virginian-Pilot. They examine what effect this has on our military's ability to counter the threat of sea mines.
  • Canada’s Jewish Schindler

    VICE News' reporter Rachel Browne investigates the Liberation of Christian and Yazidi Children of Iraq, which claimed to be using the group's funds to rescue hundreds of Yazidi women and girls who had been captured as slaves by Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria. Browne was the first person to report on their concerns and allegations that he was committing a fraud, and actually using his donation money to pay Yazidi families to say he rescued their family members.
  • U.S. military personnel have been convicted of $50 million worth of crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan

    U.S. military personnel committed crimes worth more than $50 million during their deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan, capitalizing on the Defense Department’s decision to depend on cash transactions there without any genuine oversight, a Center for Public Integrity investigation found.
  • A Crime Against Humanity

    Scott Pelley reports on the 2013 nerve gas attack in Syria that U.S. authorities estimate killed over 1,400 civilians, including many children. His report contains video of the aftermath never before seen. http://youtu.be/WgQjUNvrsTA
  • Dirty Brigades: No Clean Hands in Iraq’s ISIS Fight

    Torture, beheadings, the cold blooded shooting of unarmed civilians, and all of it caught on camera in war-ravaged Iraq by the perpetrators acting with impunity. But the horror show was not by ISIS this time. An ABC News investigation, "Dirty Brigades: No Clean Hands in Iraq's ISIS Fight," found ample evidence of terrorist-like atrocities routinely committed over the past year by U.S.-trained Iraqi Security Forces, who Washington has been arming as the key to defeating ISIS. Incredibly, elite Iraqi Special Forces, special police and counterterrorism units were documenting their own horrific acts, filling the dark underbelly of Iraqi social media with gruesome snapshots and videos of their own war crimes in an apparent effort to stir up sectarian bloodlust. In the first in-depth exposé and analysis of these atrocities, the ABC News Brian Ross Investigative Unit, led by Producer James Gordon Meek, spent six months collecting and researching a photo and video gallery of horrors, interviewing human rights investigators, U.S. Special Forces veterans and diplomats who served in Iraq, as well as confronting both the American and Iraqi governments with their findings. The team presented the investigation to millions over three consecutive nights on ABC World News Tonight With David Muir, accompanied by in-depth digital reports, both print and broadcast, on ABCNews.com and ABC/Apple TV.
  • State of Terror

    In an unmatched examination of the Islamic State that began well before the attacks in Paris, The Times showed the secrets behind the group’s baffling resilience, tracking ISIS on battlefields in Syria, Libya and Iraq, and exposing its recruiting techniques, money trails and systematic policy of rape.
  • ISIS Hits Home: San Bernardino

    As news of the horrific San Bernadino unfolded and all three networks went into live coverage mode, the ABC News investigative team started digging , providing investigative reporting in real time, both accurate and exclusive coverage for to a national stunned by the first major domestic terror attack by followers of ISIS. Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the ABC News Investigative team brought insights and exclusives starting with the first (and still exclusive ) photo of the female attacker Tashfeen Malik and perhaps the most riveting of images, the first exclusive look at the terror couple, husband and wife as they entered the United States through customs.
  • Nuclear Black Market Seeks IS Extremists

    The AP investigation found that a remote corner of Eastern Europe has become a thriving marketplace for nuclear material aimed at extremists in the Middle East. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBCi3lyftvo