Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "NPR" ...

  • Guilty and Charged

    When impoverished people go to court, they pile up court fines and fees. When they struggle to pay, they lose driver’s licenses, public benefits and can go to jail. NPR’s investigation “Guilty and Charged” told the little-known story of the emergence of a two-tiered system of justice that more harshly punishes the poor. The six-part series, which ran on NPR’s All Things Considered and Morning Edition, was the result of a year of reporting and research. It combined compelling personal narratives and unique data gathering to create memorable, insightful and in-depth stories.
  • Hospice Inc.

    Hospice, a specialty health service for dying people, has transformed over the past decade from its nonprofit roots into a booming industry dominated by for-profit players. HuffPost’s investigation reveals how some hospices are endangering patients in the drive for revenue, keeping them on a service specially-designed for dying people, sometimes against doctors orders, and subjecting them to treatment they and their families don’t want.
  • Civil Penalties Special Report

    In an unprecedented joint partnership investigation that took approximately three years, Mine Safety and Health News (MSHN) and National Public Radio (NPR) found that mining companies in the U.S. failed to pay $70 million in delinquent mine safety penalties - most for years, some for decades, and that these delinquent mine operators had accident rate 50% higher than mine operators who paid their fines. These companies: defied federal court orders to pay; committed 131,000 violations; reported nearly 4,000 injuries. The joint investigation of MSHN and NPR exposed a loophole in federal regulation, and lax enforcement that places U.S. miners at risk. The result was a special report by Mine Safety and Health News, and a series of radio stories by NPR that provided the foundation to challenge and change mine safety law in the U.S.
  • Delinquent Mines

    In a joint investigation, NPR and Mine Safety and Health News found that American coal and mineral mining companies that had failed to pay $70 million in delinquent mine safety penalties - most for years, some for decades, and some while defying federal court orders to pay - committed 131,000 violations, reported nearly 4,000 injuries and had an injury rate 50% higher than mines that paid their penalties, exposing a loophole in federal regulation and enforcement that places miners at risk.
  • 401(k) Plans Revealed

    Bloomberg News reporters spent months digging through thousands of pages of obscure government documents to produce a first-of-its-kind ranking, digital tool and series of stories that brought unprecedented transparency to 401(k) plans, which millions of American workers rely on for retirement. The stories, and the accompanying first-of-its kind ranking and digital tool, showed the disparities among 401(k) plans at the biggest companies in the U.S. and let workers compare them. They revealed that companies such as ConocoPhillips and Abbott Laboratories are among those with the most lucrative benefits, matching at least double what their workers put in and giving an additional payment no matter what their employees contribute.
  • Dividing Lines

    This project explored the nature, causes and consequences of political polarization in metropolitan Milwaukee and Wisconsin. It concluded that metropolitan Milwaukee is by some measures the most polarized place in swing-state America; that it has grown more politically segregated with virtually every election cycle since the 1970s; that its voters live overwhelmingly in politically homogenous neighborhoods dominated by a single party; that those communities have been moving systematically in one partisan direction (either red or blue) for more than four decades; that the partisan gap between its urban and outlying communities has been steadily growing; and that this deep and deepening polarization is a consequence of at least three factors: extreme racial segregation, unusually high levels of political engagement and activism; and at least two decades of perpetual partisan conflict and mobilizing as a result of Wisconsin’s political competitiveness, its battleground role in presidential races and the unprecedented turmoil and division over collective bargaining beginning in 2011. We also charted the rise of political segregation nationally, in the ever-growing share of voters in the United States who live in politically one-sided counties. The project also traced the dramatic changes in voting behavior in the state of Wisconsin in recent decades with the demise of ticket-splitting, the rise of extreme party-line voting, and the systematic growth of two political divides – the one between white and nonwhite voters, and the one between densely populated and less densely populated places. The series explored the relationship between Wisconsin’s high and rising political engagement and turnout rates and its deepening partisan divisions. And it explored the consequences of rising polarization and political segregation when it comes to the way campaigns are conducted, the outcomes of elections, the decline in electoral competition, and barriers to regional problem-solving. It found that as a result of partisan and geographic fault lines, the two parties in Wisconsin (and elsewhere) are increasingly drawing their support from different kinds of voters and different kinds of communities, and winning very different kinds of elections.
  • Back Home: The Enduring Battles Facing Post-9/11 Veterans

    Since Sept.11, 2001, more than 2.6 million veterans have returned from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to a county largely unprepared to meet their needs and a government that has failed on multiple levels to fulfill the obligations demanded by Congress and promised by both Republican and Democratic administrations. This eight-month investigation documents these failures and others issues in a multimedia platform that includes interactive graphics, video and written storytelling, photographs and a documentary.
  • Inside the NSA

    When the National Security Agency’s most secretive programs were first leaked in June by the former contractor Edward Snowden, the Agency was the target of countless reports and at the center of an unprecedented international response. No other U.S. agency had experienced any-thing nearing this level of criticism in recent times. As we constructed it, the N.S.A. was a story about a debate, not a villain, and we added to that debate with important information. We wanted to provide clarity on the technical capabilities of the NSA and to do that we knew we needed to get inside the Agency to see how it operates.
  • Hanford Nuclear Whistleblowers

    CBS News introduced viewers to the most contaminated nuclear waste site in the Western Hemisphere: the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. We got unprecedented access to the site and interviewed whistleblowers who say the federal plans to clean up the site are dangerous, costly, and ultimately ineffective. The clean-up at Hanford is a financial black hole, with the Department of Energy pouring billions into a plan that is untested, while underground tanks holding decades-old nuclear waste are leaking into the soil.
  • The Record: Investigating the Port Authority

    Shawn Boburg's reporting on the Port Authority resulted in two eye-opening stories that garnered international attention: one that revealed the hidden origins of a secret deal involving the naming rights of the World Trade Center; another that unraveled the true cause of a vindictive traffic jam orchestrated by Governor Chris Christie's loyalists and directed at one of his political enemies. Boburg found that the naming rights of the World Trade Center, one of the country's most iconic symbols, was sold in 1986 to a nonprofit that was run by a retiring Port Authority executive. Guy Tozzoli made millions of dollars from the deal, which went unnoticed for decades until Boburg's story prompted an investigation by the New York State Attorney General. Boburg also produced a series of investigative stories that challenged the official line about lane closures near the world's busiest bridge, eventually uncovering e-mails that linked the closures to the governor's office and forcing Christie to apologize and get rid of key advisors. Aside from a series of news breaks that kept the pressure on for months, Boburg was also the first to report on the e-mails that sent shockwaves through the Christie administration.