Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "NPR" ...

  • Insult to Injury: America’s Vanishing Worker Protections

    Driven by big business and insurers, states nationwide are dismantling workers’ compensation, slashing benefits to injured workers and making it more difficult for them to get care. Meanwhile employers are paying the lowest rates for workers’ comp insurance since the 1970s. http://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workers-compensation-benefits-by-limb http://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workers-comp-reform-by-state https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workcomp-company http://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workers-compensation-premiums-down http://www.npr.org/2015/03/05/390930229/grand-bargain-in-workers-comp-unravels-harming-injured-workers-further
  • Arizona's Dental Dangers

    Our unprecedented investigation into Arizona's dental industry exposed how patients have been repeatedly victimized by bad dentists and the unjust system that protects them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpdE4rcY4QM&feature=youtu.be http://www.abc15.com/dentaldangers
  • Red Cross

    After the devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Americans donated nearly half a billion dollars to the Red Cross, far more than any other charity received. We asked Red Cross leaders where the money went. They wouldn’t tell us. So we went to Haiti to find out. What ProPublica’s Justin Elliott and NPR’s Laura Sullivan discovered was squandered donations, unfounded claims of success, and a trail of resentment. The Red Cross claimed it provided homes to more than 130,000 Haitians. The reality: The charity built just six permanent homes in all of Haiti.
  • The Hatred of Jews in Malmö

    An investigation of the hatred towards jews in Malmö that put attention to a serious and urgent problem in a way that was unprecedented. The reporters documented the harassments by wearing kippah and the Star of David, and uncovered the reactions with hidden cameras. https://vimeo.com/119850806/
  • Missing and Murdered; Unsolved Cases of Indigenous Women and Girls

    CBC spent more than six months finding, investigating and documenting more than 230 unsolved cases of missing and murdered indigenous women in Canada over the last six decades. The result was an unprecedented multi-platform series which revealed patterns, details and information about these women and the crimes – including an interactive database featuring all of their stories. The investigation succeeded in contacting more than 110 family members, many of whom had never spoken publicly before, and surveyed them on key questions such as how effectively police had investigated their cases. Eight months after the series, the Canadian federal government called a national inquiry into the subject. http://www.cbc.ca/missingandmurdered/
  • Line of Fire: Bullets, badges and death on the street

    Even before riots swept Ferguson, Mo., WPTV NewsChannel 5 and The Palm Beach Post teamed up to take on an unprecedented assignment: Track every police-involved shooting since 2000. We spent more than one year gathering public records and creating a database to track every detail from 256 incidents. Our joint investigation found Palm Beach County’s largest law enforcement agency cleared deputies in nearly every shooting and showed a pattern of rushing to judgment and ignoring evidence to reach those conclusions.
  • The Whistleblowers

    As many in the news media have turned away from whistleblowers and the inside scandals they can reveal about government and corporations, we produced a series of original reports using brave and credible whistleblowers as primary sources on important topics ranging from civil rights violations to the government’s unprecedented and bizarre treatment of a whistleblower who helped the U.S. recover billions of tax dollars.
  • Qatar: The Price of Glory 2015

    The Price of Glory is an HBO Real Sports investigation into Qatar’s plan to achieve international recognition through sport and the price it has exacted in fair play, human rights, and even human lives. Our investigation found that the Qatari sports plan is one of unprecedented ambition and ruthlessness, based on the exploitation of foreign labor on and off the field. To build world-class athletic teams, Qatar has crisscrossed the world, paying athletes from the poorest countries on earth to become naturalized Qatari citizens. Real Sports heard it first hand from an entire team of Bulgarian weightlifters paid by Qatar to assume Arabic identities and represent the Gulf state in international competition. Our story detailed the systemic bribery that allowed this stiflingly hot desert sheikhdom without a soccer tradition to improbably win the right to host the 2022 World Cup. Ten months before a series of arrests of FIFA officials suspected of taking bribes, Real Sports spoke with a former FIFA insider about the corrupt bidding process, and detailed how Qatari officials bought their way to the very top of world soccer by plying FIFA officials on five continents. Off the field, Real Sports documented how Qatar’s sports glory is built on the backs of hundreds of thousands of the poorest people in Asia, imported and indentured to create a lavish World Cup city in the desert. Our team watched workers toil in 117-degree heat and followed them into the decrepit labor camps few outsiders have seen in order to expose the brutal conditions in which they are bonded into effective slavery. Viewers will see why thousands of these migrant workers are projected to die on the job by the time the 2022 World Cup games begin. When we first aired the piece the Qatari government told us changes were coming and that we should stand by. We took them up on their offer and revisited the situation a year later, only to find that none of the changes to the bonded labor system—known as Kafala—had taken place. In fact Nepali migrant workers were even prohibited from returning home after a massive earthquake ravaged their country. Worse still—our follow-up investigation found that some of the top people in Qatari sport weren’t just using their money to buy athletes, they were using it to fund terrorist organizations and invite radical jihadi clerics to speak at their elite sports academy. Our project spanned four years of research, four continents, and scores of interviews with athletes, activists, migrant workers, FIFA insiders, and US government officials.
  • Border surge began as crime fell

    Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry and other top state officials sold a massive border state police and Texas National Guard buildup on tales of violent transnational crime spilling across the Rio Grande River. In a void of federal border security, only Texas could stem the tide, the narrative went. But after a months-long open records battle with the Texas Department of Public Safety, a finalist for the 2015 IRE Golden Padlock Award, and an unprecedented data analysis, the Houston Chronicle proved violent crime rates had been declining for years before the surge and were not significantly affected by the extra manpower.
  • Under The Radar

    In an exhaustive, unprecedented review of more than 1,300 military court martial cases the Scripps Washington Bureau discovered at least 242 convicted military rapists, child molesters, and other sex offenders have fallen under the radar and slipped through what a member of the House Armed Services Committee calls a “gaping loophole” in the system. Scripps discovered some military sex offenders go on to re-offend in heinous ways on unsuspecting victims in the civilian world.