Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "NPR" ...

  • The Pentagon Finally Details its Weapons-for-Cops Giveaway

    The Marshall Project, in collaboration with MuckRock, published, for the first time, agency-level data on the Pentagon's 1033 program, a program brought to light during the protests in Ferguson, Mo., in which the Pentagon gives surplus weapons, aircraft and vehicles to law enforcement agencies. We wrote an initial story on the data, created an easy-to-use, embeddable widget, and put together a "Department of Defense gift guide," highlighting some of the more perplexing giveaways. The story led to unprecedented public scrutiny of military equipment going to law enforcement agencies, as over forty local news outlets published articles detailing what their local cops had received.
  • Following political money in a post-Citizens United world

    The Center for Public Integrity’s “Following political money in a post-Citizens United world” project was produced to help people understand which special interests are trying to influence U.S. elections, specifically by tracking the entities saturating television airwaves ahead of the 2014 elections and by following the money flowing from corporations to politically active nonprofits that generally do not disclose their donors. Together, the Center for Public Integrity’s widely used “Who’s Buying the Senate?” and “Who’s Calling the Shots in the States?” web apps allowed journalists and the General public to see what groups and power players were behind more than 2.5 million TV ads that aired in U.S. Senate races, statewide ballot measures and state-level contests such as gubernatorial elections and state Supreme Court races. Separately, the Center for Public Integrity’s seven-month-long analysis of voluntary corporate filings uncovered more than $173 million given to politically active nonprofits — such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce — that have been major players in elections and public policy battles.
  • Motherless Monkeys

    Noah Phillips' story exposed for the first time a controversial planned experiment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that involved depriving newborn monkeys of their mothers and exposing them to frightening situations to gauge the impact on their brain functioning and behavior. The experiment calls for the monkeys to then be euthanized when they turn 1. Phillips' even-handed treatment of animal activists and researchers alike lead him to obtain unprecedented access to the facilities at UW-Madison, which has been the target of frequent protests because of its controversial animal experiments dating back to the 1940s. Phillips' story has been praised by both sides for its accurate and insightful portrayal of the proposed study. It generated significant public debate -- including an online signature campaign that garnered more than 300,000 signatures -- and revealed a deep division among UW-Madison officials about the propriety of the research, which as of this date remains stalled.
  • The Red Cross’ Secret Disaster

    The American Red Cross has botched recent disaster relief efforts and been serially misleading about how it uses donors’ money.
  • Who’s calling the shots in U.S. elections? How big money and secret contributions influence politics

    The Center for Public Integrity “Who’s calling the shots in U.S. elections? How big money and secret contributions influence politics” was produced to help people understand which special interests are trying to influence U.S. elections and the political process. The series tracked where the money was coming from and where it was going. It also looked at how the government regulates this new territory in the post-Citizens United era when nonprofits that don’t publicly disclose their donors can take on unprecedented political roles.
  • justStopCO

    For one year, KUSA-TV and Rocky Mountain PBS/I-News collaborated to provide unprecedented perspective to what many have called the hit-and-run epidemic in Colorado. Through a series of reports, a half-hour special, and one of the largest hit-and-run databases in the country, justStopCO allows their viewers the opportunity to understand the depth of the problem while equipping them with the resources to do something about it. Their series not only changed minds, it also changed law.
  • An Inside Track

    A groundbreaking investigation by Dallas Morning News reporters Ed Timms and Kevin Krause exposed questionable practices by a nonprofit agency created by local governments in part to avoid public scrutiny of the certification process for minority- and woman-owned businesses.. The reporters and their newspaper fought a lengthy legal battle for more than a year that resulted in a strong legal precedent that may deter other governments from trying to circumvent open records law by forming nonprofits. The investigation revealed that the local governments had relied on a temporary employment firm had operated the nonprofit agency for more than a decade. Employees of that private firm certified their own company as a minority-owned business, even as it won millions in contracts from those same governments. The employees also decided whether their company's competitors and subcontractors got certified. It also disclosed that the company, and other contractors, failed to adequately screen temporary employees provided to Dallas County.
  • 935 Lies: The Future of Truth and the Decline of America's Moral Integrity

    935 Lies explores the many ways truth is manipulated by governments and corporations. Through examples ranging from the countless lies administrations of both parties have used to justify needless wars to the successful, decades-long corporate suppression of the truth about tobacco and other dangerous products, the author shows how the value of truth is diminished by delay. He explains the political, social, and business changes that have increasingly weakened the ability of journalists to play their traditional truth-telling role. And he describes the new trends, such as the new nonprofit journalism ecosystem that give reason to be hopeful about the future of truth. (excerpted from the book jacket).
  • Juris Imprudence

    The Center for Public Integrity’s “Juris Imprudence” project penetrated the veil of secrecy surrounding the financial holdings and activities of the nation’s most powerful judges. The Center collected, digitized, analyzed and ultimately made public the financial disclosures of 255 federal appellate judges in an unprecedented, searchable database. Using those documents, the reporting team uncovered more than two dozen examples where jurists violated federal law by allowing their personal financial ties to overlap with their caseloads.
  • Killed in the Line of Training

    Neal Smith had excelled at his first day in an elite firefighter training exercise. But on Day 2, trapped in a small space and weighed down by 75 pounds of gear, he became disoriented in the fog and collapsed on the second floor of the building he was making his way through. A trainer screamed at him to get up, but he couldn't. His internal temperature was 108 degrees; his brain was swelling. When Mayday was called it was too late. Rushed to a nearby hospital, the experienced firefighter died there later that day. Most people assume that all firefighters are trained by their own fire departments. But departments in small town Texas actually have been sending their personnel to the East Texas Firemen's and Fire Marshal's Association, a nonprofit trade group for volunteer firefighters. And unlike a governmental agency, there is no oversight of that group's methods or standards. As a subsequent investigation by the state fire marshal's office and by the National Institute of Safety and Health revealed the training camp was so poorly run that several other firefighters had dropped out (saying they didn't want to risk their lives), passed out or been taken to the hospital. Had safety procedures standard in most fire departments been in place – such as a simple tub of ice – Smith could have been saved at the training camp site.