Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Sandy Hook" ...

  • The Hartford Courant's five-year fight for Adam Lanza documents

    The Hartford Courant waged a five-year battle for documents seized from Sandy Hook Elementary School shooter Adam Lanza's house and the resulting stories provided the most-detailed picture of one of the country's most-notorious mass killers.
  • Newtown One Year After

    Mother Jones senior editor Mark Follman spent the past year covering the recurring tragedies of mass shootings while researching his “Guide to Mass Shootings in America”—a first-of-its-kind, continuously updated dataset that Follman started in July 2012 after the Aurora movie theater shooting. In advance of the December 2013 anniversary of the killings in Newtown, Follman took on a new, especially devastating aspect of the guns beat: He led a group of reporters in documenting the children ages 12 and under who were killed by firearms in the year since the Sandy Hook tragedy. The team undertook an exhaustive analysis, scouring news reports to generate a comprehensive picture of the effects of guns on children in America. Their findings were stark: In the last year alone, guns killed at least 194 children—across 43 states, from inner cities to rural towns. Their average age: 6. The vast majority—127 in total—died in their own homes, with 72 children pulling the trigger themselves or being shot by another child and 60 dying at the hands of their own parents. As many cases don’t make the news, Follman cites medical research that pegs the actual number of child deaths from guns to around 500 each year.
  • Newtown One Year After

    Mother Jones senior editor Mark Follman spent the past year covering the recurring tragedies of mass shootings while researching his “Guide to Mass Shootings in America”—a first-of-its-kind, continuously updated dataset that Follman started in July 2012 after the Aurora movie theater shooting. In advance of the December 2013 anniversary of the killings in Newtown, Follman took on a new, especially devastating aspect of the guns beat: He led a group of reporters in documenting the children ages 12 and under who were killed by firearms in the year since the Sandy Hook tragedy.
  • Newtown 911 Tapes

    In the face of opposition from government officials, the public and colleagues in the media, The Associated Press aggressively fought for 911 records and documents related to the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The request, begun as a routine newsgathering effort, turned into a high-profile fight for public information as state legislators tried to claw back Connecticut’s open records laws.
  • America's Gun: The Rise of the AR-15

    CNBC tells the story of one gun: the nation’s most popular and feared firearm, now at the center of a wrenching national debate. The AR-15 is legal and lethal, loved by some and despised by others, assailed and defended, seven pounds of metal and plastic that has become a symbol in the great divide between those who say it belongs only on the battlefield and others who insist owning one is their inalienable right.
  • Unmasking the NRA's Inner Circle

    On Friday, December 21, 2012, one long week after the Newtown, Connecticut Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, the National Rifle Association's longtime CEO, Wayne LaPierre, finally addressed the nation. He spoke at length but took no questions from the press. LaPierre refused to draw any link between the nation's gun policies and the grisly tragedy, or to acknowledge any possible negative role played the NRA to influence gun policies. Instead the longtime NRA CEO suggested that the fault of the tragedy lied with local authorities and educators as no one at the grade school was armed. Less than four weeks later, on January 16, 2013, Mother Jones ran the story, "EXCLUSIVE: Unmasking the NRA's Inner Circle." The piece revealed the shadowy, inner workings of the NRA leadership through a previously unpublished internal "Report of the Nominating Committee" to the NRA board: The CEO of the firm that made the Bushmaster rifle used inside the school had quietly served on the NRA board's Nominating Committee to help control the NRA's latest elections, and the "chairman" of the Nominating Committee was a longtime (and still) NRA board member who --unbeknownst to all the press that had recently scoured Newtown-- lived and owned a home in Newtown less than three miles from the Sandy Hook school. The story revealed --within less than 30 days of LaPierre's national television address-- the depth of the NRA's ties to the gun industry including Freedom Group whose profits have led the industry through sales of Bushmaster AR-15 rifles. The piece, which noted that the NRA board operates in secrecy more like a private corporation or Communist-era politburo than any nonprofit group, showed how the NRA board's ruling clique tightly controls who is nominated for the NRA board to thwart any possible challenges to their power. The "exclusive" went viral on the Internet, as any Google search can confirm, and led me to become an MSNBC contributor , identified repeatedly by Lawrence O'Donnell over the ensuing year as the investigative reporter "who went inside the NRA."
  • Newtown School Massacre

    A gunman killed 20 first graders and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The Courant deployed its most seasoned and well-connected reporters after the tragic killing with a goal of providing accurate and detailed information in the hours and days after the incident.