Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Saudi Arabia" ...

  • The Disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi

    CNN was across the mysterious disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi with its Istanbul team the day the Saudi journalist vanished. As the mystery deepened and Saudi Arabia continued to insist that Khashoggi had left the consulate, CNN worked the story from Istanbul, Ankara, Riyadh, London and Washington. Crucially CNN broke a number of stories in the developing mystery which shed light on what really happened and Saudi Arabia’s role.
  • Secrets of the Kingdom

    A searchlight on Saudi Arabia exposes covert support for Islamic terrorists, nagging tensions over religious strictness and the hajj pilgrimage calamity.
  • The Global Heist

    A two-year Wall Street Journal investigation uncovered a $6 billion international scandal, sprawling from Hollywood to Saudi Arabia to the prime minister of Malaysia, through Wall Street banks, white-shoe law firms and holes in the financial system.
  • How your 401k profits from bombing Yemen

    An exclusive investigation series tracking shipments of weapons exported by Italy to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates since the bombing campaign on Yemen began in March 2015. The investigation found verifiable evidence of the Italian-manufactured bombs on the ground in Yemen, and showed how readers may be profiting from the sales of these weapons through sovereign and institutional funds.
  • Buying the Election

    “Never Mind the Super PACs: How Big Business Is Buying the Election” investigates previously unreported ways that businesses have taken advantage of the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling, which overturned a century of campaign finance law and allowed corporations to spend directly on behalf of candidates. The piece debunks a common misperception that businesses have taken advantage of their new political spending powers primarily through so-called Super PACs. In fact, most Super PAC donations have come from extremely wealthy individuals, not corporations. The investigation shows how corporations have instead used a variety of 501(c) nonprofits, primarily 501(c)(6) “trade associations,” to direct substantial corporate money on federal elections. As one prominent advisor to GOP candidates as well as corporations points out, "many corporations will not risk running ads on their own," for fear of the reputational damage, but the trade groups make these ad buys nearly anonymous. In 2010, 501(c)(6) trade associations and 501(c)(4) issue-advocacy groups outspent Super PACs $141 million to $65 million. The investigation shows that the growth of trade association political spending has had a number of significant ramifications, such as increased leverage during beltway lobbying campaigns. Most troublingly, legal loopholes allow foreign interests to use trade associations to directly influence American elections. One of the most significant revelations in the piece was that the American Petroleum Institute, a trade association for the oil and gas industry, had funneled corporate cash to groups that had run hard-hitting campaign ads while being led in part by a lobbyist for the Saudi Arabian government, Tofiq Al-Gabsani. As an API board member, Al-Gabsani was part of the team that directed these efforts, which helped defeat candidates who supported legislation that would move American energy policy away from its focus on fossil fuels. Federal law prevents Al-Gabsani, as a foreign national, from leading a political action committee, or PAC. But nothing in the law stopped him from leading a trade group that made campaign expenditures just as a PAC would.
  • Project Simoom

    Our investigation "Project Simoom" revealed how the Swedish government in secret helped Saudi Arabia with the planning of an advanced weapons factory. In order to hide the plans from the public a state agency set up an illegal dummy corporation formed with cash from the military intelligence service to handle the project with the saudis. Our disclosure forced the Defence minister Sten Tolgfors and his staff to resign, and stopped the construction of the weapons factory, the investigation has won several awards including the number one broadcast award in Europe "Prix Europa"
  • The Oil Kings

    The Oil Kings is a new investigative history of U.S. relations with Iran and Saudi Arabia during the 1970s, with a special focus on former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's complex and secretive dealings with Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi of Iran.
  • Terrorists in Love

    The book profiles six radical Muslim men from Pakistan, Afhganistan and Saudi Arabia and reveals their mystical dreams and visions, sexual repression and crumbling family structures.
  • "Black Money"

    This investigative report reveals that a "trillion dollars in bribes," are paid each year regardless of an international anti-bribery treaty that is in place. The bribes, also known as "black money," are used by "multinational companies" to get overseas business. The bribes cause a break in the "stability of governments" and "distort the marketplace."
  • Inside Gitmo

    "Speaking publicly for the first time, senior U.S. law enforcement investigators say they waged a long but futile battle inside the Pentagon to stop coercive and degrading treatment of detainees by intelligence interrogators at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba."